Sentient in Seattle – 25 April 2018

Musings in Spring: Willa Cather

“I like trees because they seem more resigned to the way they have to live than other things do. I feel as if this tree knows everything I ever think of when I sit here. When I come back to it, I never have to remind it of anything; I begin just where I left off.”

Art for Spring – Part I of IV: Lionel Dougy (French, 1952-2008)

Below – “African Memory”; “China Pearl”; “Midwest Warmth”


For Your Information: 25 April is National Zucchini Bread Day in the United States.


Art for Spring – Part II of IV: Jerry Wayne Downs (American, contemporary)

Below – “Carmel Cypress”; “Introduction to an Alien Culture”; “Locomotion No. 3”

Remembering a Writer on the Date of His Birth: Born 25 April 1873 – Walter de la Mare, n English poet, short story writer, and novelist.

“Silver”
by Walter de la Mare

Slowly, silently, now the moon
Walks the night in her silver shoon;
This way, and that, she peers, and sees
Silver fruit upon silver trees;
One by one the casements catch
Her beams beneath the silvery thatch;
Couched in his kennel, like a log,
With paws of silver sleeps the dog;
From their shadowy cote the white breasts peep
Of doves in silver feathered sleep
A harvest mouse goes scampering by,
With silver claws, and silver eye;
And moveless fish in the water gleam,
By silver reeds in a silver stream.


Art for Spring – Part III of IV: John Doyle (American, 1939-2010)

Below – “Keno & Twenty-One”; “Pool Players”; “Bingo and Bookie”

Worth a Thousand Words: A view of Mount Rainier from Seattle.

Art for Spring – Part IV of IV: William Doyle (Australian, 1932-2001)

Below – “Ghost Gums”; “Uninvited Guests”; “Au Cafe”

Musings in Spring: Lucy Maud Montgomery

“‘I love to smell flowers in the dark,’ she said. ‘You get hold of their soul then.’”


American Art – Neal Doty (1941-2016)

In the words of one writer, “Neal Doty was born in 1941 in Glendale, California. Doty studied at the Art Center School of Design (Los Angeles, 1967); Los Angeles City College (AA Degree, Fine Art, 1971); and California State University at Northridge (BA Degree, Fine Art, 1973). Doty served for the US Forces during the Viet Nam war. Neal Doty has achieved worldwide acclaim as well as many highly regarded commissions and awards for his artistic talents.”

Below – “Ghost Dance”; “Destiny’s Child”; “Mardi Gras”; “Eyes of the Dove 2”; “Queen”; “On Golden Pond.”

Posted in Art and Photography, Books, Movies, Music, and Television, Opinion | Leave a comment

A Lament for America in the Age of Trump – 25 April 2018

“Stupidity is the same as evil if you judge by the results.” ― Margaret Atwood.

Posted in Opinion | Leave a comment

Notes from the Emerald City – 25 April 2018

FAQ: Does The Emerald City have a Wizard? If so, is he Great and Terrible?

It does have a Wizard, and he is indeed Great and Terrible. In fact, Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson is generally regarded as the unofficial Emperor of Seattle. He has absolute sovereignty over both the approximately 150 shops that sell his deliciously addictive beverages throughout the Land of Oz and the more than 27,000 additional cafes that can be found across the United States and in nearly every country on the planet. Johnson also has an almost equally powerful ally to assist him in his quest for world domination.

Posted in Art and Photography, Books, Movies, Music, and Television, Opinion | Leave a comment

Sentient in Seattle – 24 April 2018

Musings in Spring: Ellen Glasgow

“Life is never what one dreams. It is seldom what one desires, but, for the vital spirit and the eager mind, the future will always hold the search for buried treasure and the possibility of high adventure.”


Art for Spring – Part I of III: Ken Done (Australian, contemporary)

Below – “China Beach” (triptych); “Sunbathers on the Beach”; “City Garden”

Remembering a Writer on the Date of Her Death: Died 24 April 1942 – Lucy Maud Montgomery, a Canadian novelist, short story writer, poet, essayist, and author of “Anne of Green Gables.”

Some quotes from the work of Lucy Maud Montgomery:

“Isn’t it nice to think that tomorrow is a new day with no mistakes in it yet?”
“Life is worth living as long as there’s a laugh in it.”
“Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.”
“You may tire of reality but you never tire of dreams.”
“Look at that sea, girls–all silver and shadow and vision of things not seen. We couldn’t enjoy its loveliness any more if we had millions of dollars and ropes of diamonds.”
“Isn’t it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive–it’s such an interesting world. It wouldn’t be half so interesting if we know all about everything, would it? There’d be no scope for imagination then, would there?”
“That’s the worst of growing up, and I’m beginning to realize it. The things you wanted so much when you were a child don’t seem half so wonderful to you when you get them.”
“Some people go through life trying to find out what the world holds for them only to find out too late that it’s what they bring to the world that really counts.”

Art for Spring – Part II of III: David Dornan (American, contemporary)

Below – “Flott”; “Poise”; “Flip”

Worth a Thousand Words: Big Bend National Park, Texas.

Art for Spring – Part III of III: John Douglas (American, contemporary)

Below – “Night Dream”; “Flowers Thru Time 3 and 4”; “Corner of Your Eye”


Remembering a Writer on the Date of Her Death: Died 24 April 1947 – Willa Cather, an American novelist and recipient of the Pulitzer Prize.

Some quotes from the work of Willa Cather:

“There are some things you learn best in calm, and some in storm.”
“Whatever we had missed, we possessed together the precious, the incommunicable past.”
“I was something that lay under the sun and felt it, like the pumpkins, and I did not want to be anything more. I was entirely happy. Perhaps we feel like that when we die and become a part of something entire, whether it is sun and air, or goodness and knowledge. At any rate, that is happiness; to be dissolved into something complete and great. When it comes to one, it comes as naturally as sleep.”
“Men travel faster now, but I do not know if they go to better things.”
“What was any art but a mold to imprison for a moment the shining elusive element which is life itself- life hurrying past us and running away, to strong to stop, too sweet to lose.”
“Isn’t it queer: there are only two or three human stories, and they go on repeating themselves as fiercely as if they had never happened before; like the larks in this country, that have been singing the same five notes over for thousands of years.”

This Date in Art History – Born 24 April 1878 – Jean Crotti, a Swiss-French painter.

Below – “L’harmonie nait du chaos”; “Attentive aux Voix Intérieures”; “Vision”; “Woman with Boat”; “Woman with Hat.”

Remembering a Writer on the Date of His Birth: Born 24 April 1905 – Robert Penn Warren, an American poet, novelist, literary critic, and the only person to have won Pulitzer Prizes for both fiction and poetry.

“Evening Hawk”
by Robert Penn Warren

From plane of light to plane, wings dipping through
Geometries and orchids that the sunset builds,
Out of the peak’s black angularity of shadow, riding
The last tumultuous avalanche of
Light above pines and the guttural gorge,
The hawk comes.
His wing
Scythes down another day, his motion
Is that of the honed steel-edge, we hear
The crashless fall of stalks of Time.

The head of each stalk is heavy with the gold of our error.

Look! Look! he is climbing the last light
Who knows neither Time nor error, and under
Whose eye, unforgiving, the world, unforgiven, swings
Into shadow.

Long now,
The last thrush is still, the last bat
Now cruises in his sharp hieroglyphics. His wisdom
Is ancient, too, and immense. The star
Is steady, like Plato, over the mountain.

If there were no wind we might, we think, hear
The earth grind on its axis, or history
Drip in darkness like a leaking pipe in the cellar.

Contemporary American Art – Jim Dine

In the words of one writer, “New York Artist Jim Dine is a leader of the Pop Art Movement. He first studied at the University of Cincinnati, The Boston Museum of Fine Arts School and the University of Ohio. His first exhibition was with fellow artist and co-collaborator, Claes Oldenburg in 1959. In the Dadaist’s style, Jim Dine used mixed media and the ready-made to produce his paintings. Dine began experimenting with performance art in the 1950’s. Dine later work is a return to traditional painting techniques incorporated with collage, printing, etching, and paper-making.”

Below – “Yellow Belt”; “Bather”; “Woodcut in the Snow”; “Vegetables”; “Anemones”; “Sitting With Me Red.”

Posted in Art and Photography, Books, Movies, Music, and Television, Opinion | Leave a comment

A Lament for America in the Age of Trump – 24 April 2018

“He had just about enough intelligence to open his mouth when he wanted to eat, but certainly no more.” ― P.G. Wodehouse.

Posted in Opinion | Leave a comment

Notes from the Emerald City – 24 April 2018

FAQ: Is Seattle a friendly city?

Not particularly. In fact, its residents tend to regard one another with such cold and studied indifference that there is actually a term for it: “The Seattle Chill.”

Below – A citizen of The Emerald City ignoring his neighbors.

Posted in Art and Photography, Books, Movies, Music, and Television, Opinion | Leave a comment

Notes from The Emerald City – 23 April 2018

FAQ: Seattle advertises itself as The Emerald City, but is there a Yellow Brick Road leading to its glorious inner precincts?

Indeed there is – lovely Aurora Avenue North, famed for its rush hour traffic, seedy motels, and friendly prostitutes. Stroll a few blocks along this magical boulevard and you will quickly realize that you are not in Kansas anymore

Posted in Art and Photography, Books, Movies, Music, and Television, Opinion | Leave a comment

Sentient in Seattle – 23 April 2018

Musings in Spring: Ellen Glasgow

“The older I grow the more earnestly I feel that the few joys of childhood are the best that life has to give.”

Below – Stephen S. Yaeger: “Children Playing at a Pond”

This Date in Art History: Born 23 April 1916 – Yiannis Moralis, a Greek painter: Part I of II

Below – “By the Outdoor Photographer”; “Two Girl Friends”; “Figure”; “Portrait of Fani”; “Three Women Sitting”; “Female Nude.”

Worth a Thousand Words: A desert beach, Namibia.

This Date in Art History: Born 23 April 1916 – Yiannis Moralis, a Greek painter: Part II of II

Below – “Still Life with Shoes”; “Summer”; “Funerary Composition I”; “Pregnant Woman”; “Nude”; “Two Girls Sitting.”

Musings in Spring: Cassandra Clare

“There’s something about a place you’ve been with someone you love. It takes on a meaning in your mind. It becomes more than a place. It becomes a distillation of what you felt for each other. The moments you spend in a place with someone… they become part of its bricks and mortar. Part of its soul.”

This Date in Art History: Born 23 April 1943 – Frans Koppelaar, a Dutch painter.

Below – “Backlight Langestraat”; “Sunset at Katwijk”; “Brown eyed Girl”; “Early Spring at Realengracht”; “Westerdok in winter”; “Backlight at Singel.”

Remembering an Influential Writer on the Date of His Death: Died 23 April 1850 – Willian Wordsworth, an English Romantic poet and co-author (with Samuel Coleridge) of “Lyrical Ballads.”

“The World is Too Much With Us”
by William Wordsworth

The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;—
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;
For this, for everything, we are out of tune;
It moves us not. Great God! I’d rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreathèd horn.

Below – Benjamin Robert Haydon: “Portrait of William Wordsworth”; a drawing of Triton.


American Art – Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859-1937): Part I of II

In the words of one writer, “Henry Ossawa Tanner was an American artist and the first African-American painter to gain international acclaim. Tanner moved to Paris, France, in 1891 to study, and continued to live there after being accepted in French artistic circles.”
Below – “Spinning by Firelight”; “Gateway, Tangier”; “The Arch”; “The Banjo Lesson”; “The Seine”; “Fishermen at Sea.”


Musings in Spring: John Muir

“Between every two pine trees there is a door leading to a new way of life.”


American Art – Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859-1937): Part II of II

In the words of one writer, “Henry Ossawa Tanner was an American artist and the first African-American painter to gain international acclaim. Tanner moved to Paris, France, in 1891 to study, and continued to live there after being accepted in French artistic circles.”
Below – “Sand Dunes at Sunset – Atlantic City”; “The Young Sabot Maker”; “Coastal Landscape, France”; “View of the Seine, looking toward Nortre Dame”; “A View of Fez”; “Daniel in the Lions’ Den (This painting was accepted into the 1896 Salon, Paris).

Posted in Art and Photography, Books, Movies, Music, and Television, Opinion | Leave a comment

A Lament for America in the Age of Trump – 23 April 2018

“Evil isn’t the real threat to the world. Stupid is just as destructive as Evil, maybe more so, and it’s a hell of a lot more common. What we really need is a crusade against Stupid. That might actually make a difference.” ― Jim Butcher, American writer.

Posted in Opinion | Leave a comment

Sentient in Seattle – 22 April 2018

Remembering a Writer on the Date of Her Birth: Born 22 April 1873 – Ellen Glasgow, an American novelist.

Some quotes from the work of Ellen Glasgow:

“Human nature. I don’t like human nature, but I do like human beings.”
“The only difference between a rut and a grave are the dimensions.”
“All change is not growth, as all movement is not forward.”
“Most women want their youth back again; but I wouldn’t have mine back at any price. The worst years of my life are behind me, and my best ones ahead.”
“Why do all of us, every last one, have to go through hell to find out what we really want?”
“But there is, I have learned, no permanent escape from the past. It may be an unrecognized law of our nature that we should be drawn back, inevitably, to the place where we have suffered most.”
“In the past few years, I have made a thrilling discovery … that until one is over sixty, one can never really learn the secret of living. One can then begin to live, not simply with the intense part of oneself, but with one’s entire being.”

Art for Spring – Part I of II: Jos Diazdel (Spanish, contemporary)

Below – “Minotauro”; “Menga”; “Cleopatra”

For Your Information: 22 April is Earth Day.

Below – The Earth Day Flag.


Art for Spring – Part II of II: Robert Deyber ( American, contemporary)

Below – “Love and Hate Are Two Horns on the Same Goat II”; “The Day He Met His Match III”; “Fish and Chips”


Remembering a Writer on the Date of Her Death: Died 22 April 1995 – Jane Kenyon, an American poet.

“The Suitor”
by Jane Kenyon

We lie back to back. Curtains
lift and fall,
like the chest of someone sleeping.
Wind moves the leaves of the box elder;
they show their light undersides,
turning all at once
like a school of fish.
Suddenly I understand that I am happy.
For months this feeling
has been coming closer, stopping
for short visits, like a timid suitor.


This Date in Art History: Died 22 April 1929 – Henry Lerolle, a French painter.

Below – “The Organ Rehearsal”; “The Keeper of the Sheep”; “The Harvesters”; “Farmers in the Field”; “The Long Walk”; “A Lady at Her Toilette.”

Remembering a Philosopher and Writer on the Date of His Death: Died 22 April 1986 – Mircea Eliade, a Romanian historian of religion, fiction writer, philosopher, professor at the University of Chicago, and author of “The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion.”

Some quotes from the work of Mircea Eliade:

“Man becomes aware of the Sacred because it manifests itself, shows itself, as something wholly different from the Profane … In his encounters with the Sacred, man experiences a reality that does not belong to our world yet is encountered in and through objects or events that are part of the world.”
“The way towards ‘wisdom’ or towards ‘freedom’ is the way towards your inner being. This is the simplest definition of metaphysics.”
“As long as you have not grasped that you have to die to grow, you are a troubled guest on the dark earth.”
“In imitating the exemplary acts of a god or of a mythic hero, or simply by recounting their adventures, the man of an archaic society detaches himself from profane time and magically re-enters the Great Time, the sacred time.”
“The history of religions reaches down and makes contact with that which is essentially human: the relation of man to the sacred. The history of religions can play an extremely important role in the crisis we are living through. The crises of modern man are to a large extent religious ones, insofar as they are an awakening of his awareness to an absence of meaning.”


This Date in Art History: Died 22 April 1945 – Kathe Kollwitz, a German painter, printmaker, and sculptor.

Below – “Misery”; “Bust of a Working Woman in Blue Shawl”; “The Young Couple”; “The Grieving Parents”; “Woman with Dead Child.”

Worth a Thousand Words: Carcross, a railroad town in Yukon Territory, Canada.

This Date in Art History: Died 22 April 1984 – Ansel Adams, an American photographer.

Below – “Aspens, Northern New Mexico”; “Clearing Winter Storm, Yosemite National Park”; “Sand Dunes, Oceano, California”; “Oak Tree – Snow Storm”; “Moon and Clouds, California”; “Moon and Half Dome.”


Remembering a Writer on the Date of Her Birth: Born 22 April 1943 – Louise Gluck, an American poet and recipient of the National Book Award.

“Elms”
by Louise Gluck

All day I tried to distinguish
need from desire. Now, in the dark,
I feel only bitter sadness for us,
the builders, the planers of wood,
because I have been looking
steadily at these elms
and seen the process that creates
the writhing, stationary tree
is torment, and have understood
it will make no forms but twisted forms.


This Date in Art History: Born 22 April 1922 – Richard Diebenkorn, an American painter.

Below – “Sitting Woman”; “Woman in Profile”; “A Long Time Alone”; “Driveway”; “Coffee”; Untitled; “Interior with a Book.”

Posted in Art and Photography, Books, Movies, Music, and Television, Opinion | Leave a comment