March Offerings – Part XXIII: Something to Delight both Head and Heart

American Art – Part I of IV: Tim Lowly

In addition to being a painter, artist Tim Lowly is a musician and a teacher. He lives and works in Chicago.
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French Art – Part I of II: Raoul Dufy

“My eyes were made to erase all that is ugly.” – Raoul Dufy, French Fauvist painter, draftsman, printmaker, book illustrator, and scenic designer, who died 23 March 1953.

Below – “Mediterranean Scene”; “Interior with Indian Woman”; “Regatta at Cowes”; “Coach“; “The Two Models”; “At the Races.”
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Born 23 March 1915 – Vasily Grigoryevich Zaytsev, a Russian sniper and a Hero of the Soviet Union during World War II. In the words of one historian, “(Zaytsev was) notable particularly for his activities between 10 November and 17 December 1942, during the Battle of Stalingrad; during this five-week period he killed 225 soldiers and officers of the Wehrmacht and other Axis armies, including 11 enemy snipers.”

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French Art – Part II of II: Rebecca de Cachard

Here is one critic briefly describing the artistry of French painter Rebecca de Cachard (born 1969): “When she paints, Rebecca invites us into her dream, where we can maybe find a part of our childhood. It restores us, the blue sky, the ocean, an island that lies ahead over the horizon…”
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American Art – Part II of IV: Bob Byerley

In the words of one critic, “Bob Byerley is one of the foremost painters of children today. Considered a modern day Norman Rockwell, Bob’s nostalgic Trompe ‘Oleil (fool-the-eye-realism) oil paintings evoke a feeling of a kinder and gentler age in which he grew up.
His classical ultra realistic interpretations of the everyday experiences of the child, awakens in the viewer, long forgotten memories. The art combines precise academic painting techniques of the Old Dutch Masters with the heart and soul of Norman Rockwell.
Byerley’s children are real, not fabricated or cutsie. In his paintings, imagination abounds. His children interact naturally with fairies, elves and surrealistic imaginary animals. He paints children doing things rather than viewing things; his kids are alive with vitality and mischief.”
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From the American History Archives: Patrick Henry

23 March 1775 – During a speech in St. John’s Church in Richmond, Virginia, Patrick Henry proclaims, “Give me liberty, or give me death!”
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Spanish Art – Part I of III: Juan Gris

“I prefer the emotion that corrects the rule.” – Juan Gris, Spanish cubist painter and sculptor, who was born 23 March 1887.

Below – “Still Life before an Open Window”; “Portrait of Pablo Picasso”; “Violin and Checkerboard”; “Harlequin with Guitar”; “Still Life with Fruit Dish and Mandolin”; “The Painter’s Window.”

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Spanish Art – Part II of III: Juan Hernandez

Here is the Artist Statement of Juan Hernandez: “I am a Spanish artist specializing in pop art painting on wood. This time I leave the canvas and choose the wood that with its streaks emulate, without much difficulty, the characters of peoples’ skin texture which interests me. I take back with the crayons the passion I lived with them during my childhood, sharing its simple role with the intensity the acrylic gives them, without forgetting other options such as work in pastels, the charcoal or the collage.”

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From the Movie Archives: Kurosawa Akira

“Man is a genius when he is dreaming.” – Kurosawa Akira, Japanese film director, screenwriter, producer, and editor, who was born 23 March 1910.

Kurosawa Akira produced many great and influential films, including “Rashomon,” “Ikiru,” “Seven Samurai” (a candidate for the greatest movie ever made), “Throne of Blood” (Kurosawa’s retelling of “Macbeth”), “Hidden Fortress” (an acknowledged source for George Lucas’s “Star Wars”), “Yojimbo” (remade in the West as “A Fistful of Dollars” [starring Clint Eastwood],“Last Man Standing” [starring Bruce Willis], and “Miller’s Crossing” [starring Gabriel Byrne, directed by the Coen brothers]), “Ran” (Kurosawa’s retelling of “King Lear”), and “Dreams.”

Spanish Art – Part III of III: Enrique Donoso

Spanish painter Enrique Donoso (born 1963) is a teacher at the School of Art of Olias of the King in Toledo.

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Romanian painter Rodica Toth Poiata (born 1950) is a graduate of the Faculty of Fine Arts in Timisoara and a member of the Artists Union of Romania, Department of Painting.
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“Farewel the ocean main, we must die,

Farewel the ocean main, we must die,

Farewel the ocean main:

The coast of France or Spain

We ne’er shall see again; we must die.” – From “Captain Kidd’s Farewel to the Seas, or, the Famous Pirate’s Lament, 1701,” dedicated to the memory of Scottish sailor Captain William Kidd, legendary pirate, who was born 22 January 1645.

Captain Kidd was tried and executed for piracy after returning from a voyage to the Indian Ocean. In the words of one writer, “Some modern historians deem his piratical reputation unjust, as there is evidence that Kidd acted only as a privateer. Kidd’s fame springs largely from the sensational circumstances of his questioning before the English Parliament and the ensuing trial. His actual depredations on the high seas, whether piratical or not, were both less destructive and less lucrative than those of many other contemporary pirates and privateers.”

Captain Kidd might have escaped the noose if he had offered the same rationale for his piracy as the one offered by some contemporary music and video pirates on the Internet: “I’m not stealing; I’m sharing.” On the other hand, maybe we should start hanging a few of these modern
e-privateers.

Above – William Kidd.
Below – A drawing of Captain Kidd hanging in chains (1837).

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Chinese painter Deng Chengwen (born 1981) is a graduate of the Tianjin Academy of Fine Arts.
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“Doctors and scientists said that breaking the four-minute mile was impossible, that one would die in the attempt. Thus, when I got up from the track after collapsing at the finish line, I figured I was dead.” – Roger Bannister, English runner, who was born 23 March 1929, on his reaction on 6 May 1954 at Iffley Road Track in Oxford, after he became the first man to run the mile in under four minutes (3 minutes, 59.4 seconds).

In the words of one historian, “Bannister went on to become a distinguished neurologist and Master of Pembroke College, Oxford, before retiring in 1993. When asked whether the 4-minute mile was his proudest achievement, he said he felt prouder of his contribution to academic medicine through research into the responses of the nervous system.”

The paintings of Peruvian artist Akira Chinen have appeared in individual and group exhibitions in South America, North America, and Europe.
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German painter Christian Grosskopf (born 1963) has lived and worked in Australia, New Zealand, and Spain; he now lives and works in Berlin.
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A Poem for Today

“Venus,”
By D. Nurkse

Death is coming
and you must build a starship
to take you to Venus.

Make it from a catsup bottle,
a flashlight coil,
a penny, the cat’s bell,
Mom’s charm bracelet.

They say that planet is torment,
whipped by circular wind,
choked in vitriol clouds.

But no. When you get there
it is a light in the sky
and I am with you.

If you find nothing else,
borrow the pleated wing
of a winter moth,
lighter than dust.
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American Art – Part III of IV: Tom Root

American artist Tom Root studied drawing and painting at the Lyme Academy of Fine Arts in Old Lyme, Connecticut and at the Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida.
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A Second Poem for Today

“Vulture,”
By Robinson Jeffers

I had walked since dawn and lay down to rest on a bare hillside
Above the ocean. I saw through half-shut eyelids a vulture wheeling
high up in heaven,
And presently it passed again, but lower and nearer, its orbit
narrowing,
I understood then
That I was under inspection. I lay death-still and heard the flight-
feathers
Whistle above me and make their circle and come nearer.
I could see the naked red head between the great wings
Bear downward staring. I said, “My dear bird, we are wasting time
here.
These old bones will still work; they are not for you.” But how
beautiful
he looked, gliding down
On those great sails; how beautiful he looked, veering away in the
sea-light
over the precipice. I tell you solemnly
That I was sorry to have disappointed him. To be eaten by that beak
and
become part of him, to share those wings and those eyes–
What a sublime end of one’s body, what an enskyment; what a life
after death.
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American Art – Part IV of IV: Marie Fox

Artist Statement: “Painting is my passion – still life and large figurative oils on canvas. For 15 years I created folk art, born of my memories of childhood in New England. For the past few years I’ve made small daily still-life art of fruits and vegetables, and objects both exotic and ordinary. Recently I’ve taken on the challenge of painting large – first still life and now figurative paintings. The large size is thrilling, and appropriate for this 6’1” tall artist.
In August 2009 my large figurative oil painting ‘Sounds of the Sea’ won Grand Prize at TAG Gallery’s California Open Exhibition in Santa Monica, CA.”
“Sounds of the Sea” is the first painting posted below.
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