Welcoming June 2015

Welcoming June

Below – Laurel Waters: “Summer Solstice from the Brick House”
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Greeting June: Origins

In the words of one historian, “The Latin name for June is Junius. Ovid offers multiple etymologies for the name in the Fasti, a poem about the Roman calendar. The first is that the month is named after the Roman goddess Juno, the goddess of marriage and the wife of the supreme deity Jupiter; the second is that the name comes from the Latin word iuniores, meaning ‘younger ones,’ as opposed to maiores (‘elders’) for which the preceding month May (Maius) may be named.”

Below – “June,” from the “Tres Riches Heures du Duc de Berry” (1412-1416).
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Greeting June with Art – Charles Francois Daubigny: “Fields in the Month of June”
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Greeting June with Poetry: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“June,” from “The Poet’s Calendar”

Mine is the Month of Roses; yes, and mine

The Month of Marriages! All pleasant sights

And scents, the fragrance of the blossoming vine,
The foliage of the valleys and the heights.
Mine are the longest days, the loveliest nights;
The mower’s scythe makes music to my ear;
I am the mother of all dear delights;
I am the fairest daughter of the year.
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aKeller

On this Date – Part I of V: Helen Keller

“One can never consent to creep when one feels an impulse to soar.” Helen Keller, American author, political activist, and pacifist, who died on 1 June 1968.

Keller’s remarkable story is beautifully told in the play and film “The Miracle Worker.”

Some quotes from Helen Keller:

“It is a terrible thing to see and have no vision.”
“I seldom think about my limitations, and they never make me sad. Perhaps there is just a touch of yearning at times; but it is vague, like a breeze among flowers.”
“It is hard to interest those who have everything in those who have nothing.”
“Many people know so little about what is beyond their short range of experience. They look within themselves – and find nothing! Therefore they conclude that there is nothing outside themselves either.”
“No one has a right to consume happiness without producing it.”
“The heresy of one age becomes the orthodoxy of the next.”
“People do not like to think. If one thinks, one must reach conclusions. Conclusions are not always pleasant.”
“Science may have found a cure for most evils; but it has found no remedy for the worst of them all – the apathy of human beings.”

Greeting June with Art – Toni Grote: “June 3 – Green Light Beach”
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Greeting June with Song – The Decemberists: “June Hymn”

Greeting June with Art – Eugene Grasset: “The Month of June”
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Greeting June with Poetry: Wang Wei

“On Parting with Spring”

O Day after day we can’t help growing older.
Year after year spring can’t help seeming younger.
Come let’s enjoy our wine cup today,
Nor pity the flowers fallen.
aWangWei

Greeting June with Prose: John Steinbeck

“In early June the world of leaf and blade and flowers explodes, and every sunset is different.”

Below – Matthew Gibson: “Poppy Field Landscape Under a Summer Sunset Sky”
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On this Date – Part II of V: Bob Monkhouse

“They laughed when I said I was going to be a comedian. Well, they’re not laughing now.” – Bob Monkhouse, English comedian, actor, comedy writer, and television host, who was born 1 June 1928.

Some quotes from Bob Monkhouse:

“I got my start in silent radio.”
“Growing old is compulsory – growing up is optional.”
“I’m not saying my wife’s a bad cook, but she uses a smoke alarm as a timer.”
“I spilt some stain remover on my sleeve. How do you get that out?”
“I’d never be unfaithful to my wife for the reason that I love my house very much.”
“My father only hit me once – but he used a Volvo.”
“My mother tried to kill me when I was a baby. She denied it. She said she thought the plastic bag would keep me fresh.”
“The Royal Shakespeare Company once did ‘Julius Caesar’ in New York. When Caesar was stabbed onstage, half the audience left because they didn’t want to get involved.”
“What do gardeners do when they retire?”
“When the inventor of the drawing board messed things up, what did he go back to?”
“Silence is not only golden, it is seldom misquoted.”

Welcoming June with Song – Al Stewart: “The Last Day of June 1934”

Greeting June with Art – Jim Dine: “The Month of June #3”
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Greeting June with Prose: Bernard Williams

“If a June night could talk, it would probably boast it invented romance.”

Below – Scout Cuomo: “June Nights, Fireflies Blooming from the Forest Floor”
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Greeting June with Poetry: Philip Larkin

“Cut Grass”

Cut grass lies frail:
Brief is the breath
Mown stalks exhale.
Long, long the death

It dies in the white hours
Of young-leafed June
With chestnut flowers,
With hedges snowlike strewn,

White lilac bowed,
Lost lanes of Queen Anne’s lace,
And that high-builded cloud
Moving at summer’s pace.
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Greeting June with Art – Sir Frederic Leighton: “Flaming June”
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Greeting June with Prose: Mark Twain

“It is better to be a young June-bug than an old bird of paradise.”
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On this Date – Part III of V: The Beatles

1 June 1967 – The Beatles release the album “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” in the United States.

Greeting June with Prose: Oriana Green

“I am Summer, come to lure you away from your computer… come dance on my fresh grass, dig your toes into my beaches.”

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Greeting June with Art – Nancy Poucher: “June, Cape Cod Beach Path
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Welcoming June with Song – Rascal Flatts: “Words I Couldn’t Say”

“In a moment on a front porch late one June . . .”

Greeting June with Prose: Maud Hart Lovelace

“It was June, and the world smelled of roses. The sunshine was like powdered gold over the grassy hillside.”

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Greeting June with Art – Daryl Urig: “Country View – June 3, 2009”
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On this Date – Part IV of V: The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition

1 June 1909 – The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition opens in Seattle.
This world’s fair publicized the development of the Pacific Northwest. In the words of one historian, “It was originally planned for 1907, to mark the 10th anniversary of the Klondike Gold Rush, but the organizers found out about the Jamestown Exposition being held that year, and rescheduled.”
Above – The official logo of the Exposition.
Below – The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition with a view of Mount Rainier; an aerial view of the Exposition; Alaskan and Siberian Eskimos depicted on a post card; an official Exposition post card; the Exposition’s commemorative postage stamp.
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Greeting June with Prose: Aldo Leopold

“In June, as many as a dozen species may burst their buds on a single day. No man can heed all of these anniversaries; no man can ignore all of them.”
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On this Date – Part V of V: Morgan Freeman

“I knew at an early age I wanted to act. Acting was always easy for me. I don’t believe in predestination, but I do believe that once you get wherever it is you are going, that is where you were going to be. Was I always going to be here? No I was not. I was going to be homeless at one time, a taxi driver, truck driver, or any kind of job that would get me a crust of bread. You never know what’s going to happen.” – Morgan Freeman, American actor, director, and Academy Award winner, who was born on 1 June 1937.

Morgan Freeman has appeared in many excellent movies, but my favorite among his memorable performances is his portrayal of homicide detective William Somerset in “Seven.”
The scene in which he is conducting research in a library is a glorious affirmation of both reason and artistic expression.

Greeting June with Prose: Lucy Maud Montgomery

“I wonder what it would be like to live in a world where it was always June.”

Below – June Garden
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Welcoming June with Song – Train: “Drops of Jupiter”

“She listens like Spring, and she talks like June . . .”

Greeting June with Prose: Ralph Waldo Emerson

“In these divine pleasures permitted to me of walks in the June night under moon and stars, I can put my life as a fact before me and stand aloof from its honor and shame.”

Below – Ancient bristlecone pine trees at night in June, under a sky full of stars, lit by a full moon.
Ancient bristlecone pine trees at night

Greeting June with Poetry: Pablo Neruda

“Green was the silence, wet was the light,
the month of June trembled like a butterfly.”
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Greeting June with Art – Thomas Moran: “June”

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Greeting June with Poetry: W. H. Davies

“All in June”

A week ago I had a fire
To warm my feet, my hands and face;
Cold winds, that never make a friend,
Crept in and out of every place.

Today the fields are rich in grass,
And buttercups in thousands grow;
I’ll show the world where I have been–
With gold-dust seen on either shoe.

Till to my garden back I come,
Where bumble-bees for hours and hours
Sit on their soft, fat, velvet bums,
To wriggle out of hollow flowers.

Below – Johanne Nicoline Louise Frimodt: “A Field of Buttercups by the Coast”
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Greeting June with Art – Claude Monet: “Poppies at Argenteuil, 1873, 30th of June”
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Greeting June with Prose: Henry David Thoreau

“This is June, the month of grass and leaves . . . already the aspens are trembling again, and a new summer is offered me. I feel a little fluttered in my thoughts, as if I might be too late. Each season is but an infinitesimal point. It no sooner comes than it is gone. It has no duration. It simply gives a tone and hue to my thought. Each annual phenomenon is reminiscence and prompting. Our thoughts and sentiments answer to the revolution of the seasons, as two cogwheels fit into each other. We are conversant with only one point of contact at a time, from which we receive a prompting and impulse and instantly pass to a new season or point of contact. A year is made up of a certain series and number of sensations and thoughts which have their language in nature. Now I am ice, now I am sorrel. Each experience reduces itself to a mood of the mind.”

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Greeting June with Art – Frederick Childe Hassam: “June”
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Welcome, Lovely June

Below – John William Waterhouse: “Sweet Summer”
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