September Offerings – Part XVI: Something to Delight both Head and Heart

American Art – Part I of V: Deborah Scott

Artist Statement: “I work in the genre painting tradition. My work is a mash-up of classically styled figurative painting and contemporary iconography. My narratives are based on biography, tarot, mythology and fairytale. Iconic brands and contemporary imagery support the narrative in my work.
I am a graduate of the Drawing and Painting Atelier at Gage Academy of Art. Prior to my art career, I worked in global brand marketing with familiar brands including Cheerios, Betty Crocker, and Amazon.com. In this role I became fascinated with the power of Jungian archetypes, works by Joseph Campbell, and iconography. Developing my understanding and expression of figurative archetypes is the cornerstone of my work.”
Deborah Scott paintings

aScott2

Deborah Scott paintings

Deborah Scott paintings

Deborah Scott paintings

Deborah Scott paintings

Deborah Scott paintings

Deborah Scott paintings

Deborah Scott paintings

Deborah Scott paintings

aScott11

Deborah Scott paintings

aScott13
From the Music Archives – Part I of V: B. B. King

“I don’t think anybody steals anything; all of us borrow.” – B. B. King, American blues musician, singer, songwriter, and guitarist, who was born 16 September 1925.

Ukrainian artist Natalia Makovetzkaya (born 1968) is a graduate of the I. E. Repin Institute for Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture.
aMako1

aMako2

aMako3

aMako4

aMako5

aMako6

aMako7

aMako8

aMako9

aBoyd1

“I like the pleasant things most women enjoy, even if I do wear breeches and boots on an expedition, even sleep in them at times…. but I powder my nose before going on deck, no matter how rough the sea is.” – Louise Arner Boyd, American explorer of Greenland and the Arctic and author of “The Coast of Northeast Greenland,” who was born 16 September 1887.
aBoyd2

Iranian Art – Part I of II: Saeed Rafiee Monfared

Iranian painter Saeed Rafiee Monfared (born 1971) earned a BA in Fine Art from Azad University.
aMonf1

aMonf2

aMonf3

aMonf4

aMonf5

aMonf6

From the Music Archives – Part II of V: Ringo Starr

16 September 1977 – Ringo Starr releases “Drowning in the Sea of Love.”

Iranian Art – Part II of II: Afshin Pirhashemi

According to one art historian, “The work of Iranian painter Afshin Pirhashemi (born 1974) examines the complexities of life in modern day Iran. On sparse or empty backgrounds, his largely monochromatic, photo-realistic depictions of women nod to gothic fantasy in an exploration of issues of contemporary social and political identity.”
aPir1

Afshin Pirhashemi _ paintings _ Iran _ artodyssey1

Afshin Pirhashemi _ paintings _ Iran _ artodyssey1

aPir4

Afshin Pirhashemi _ paintings _ Iran _ artodyssey1

Afshin Pirhashemi _ paintings _ Iran _ artodyssey1

Afshin Pirhashemi _ paintings _ Iran _ artodyssey1

aPir8

Afshin Pirhashemi _ paintings _ Iran _ artodyssey1

Afshin Pirhashemi _ paintings _ Iran _ artodyssey1

Afshin Pirhashemi _ paintings _ Iran _ artodyssey1

Afshin Pirhashemi _ paintings _ Iran _ artodyssey1

aPir13

aPir14

aPir15

aPir16

From the Music Archives – Part III of V: Mary Travers

Died 16 September 2009 – Mary Travers, an American singer and a member of the group Peter, Paul, and Mary.

American Art – Part II of V: Lisa Reinertson

In the words of one critic, “Lisa Reinertson is known for both her life size figurative ceramic sculptures and her large-scale public sculptures cast in bronze.
Coming from a family of peace and social activists, Reinertson’s work has an underlying humanism that can be seen both in her poetic ceramic figures with animals, to her more historic public commissions that express ideals of peace and social justice. In her public sculptures of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Cesar Chavez she blends bas-relief into her three-dimensional sculptural forms creating an historic and powerfully moving narrative. Her work combines a realism rooted in figurative art traditions, with a contemporary expression of social and psychological content.”
aRein1

aRein2

aRein3

aRein4

aRein5

aRein6

aRein7

aRein8

aRein9

aRein10

aRein11

aRein12

aParkman1
“It was a rich and gorgeous sunset – an American sunset; and the ruddy glow of the sky was reflected from some extensive pools of water among the shadowy copses in the meadow below.” – Francis Parkman, American historian and author of “The Oregon Trail: Sketches of Prairie and Rocky-Mountain Life,” who was born 16 September 1823. Here is one critic describing “The Oregon Trail”:
“The book is a breezy, first-person account of a 2-month summer tour in 1846 of the U.S. states of Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, and Kansas. Parkman was 23 at the time. The heart of the book covers the three weeks Parkman spent hunting buffalo with a band of Oglala Sioux.”

Some quotes from the work of Francis Parkman:

“Faithfulness to the truth of history involves far more than research, however patient and scrupulous, into special facts. The narrator must seek to imbue himself with the life and spirit of the time.”
“Not a breath of air stirred over the free and open prairie; the clouds were like light piles of cotton; and where the blue sky was visible, it wore a hazy and languid aspect.”
“Riding in advance, we passed over one of these great plains; we looked back and saw the line of scattered horsemen stretching for a mile or more; and far in the rear against the horizon, the white wagons creeping slowly along.”
“Here society is reduced to its original elements, the whole fabric of art and conventionality is struck rudely to pieces, and men find themselves suddenly brought back to the wants and resources of their original natures.”
aParkman2

Latvian artist Kristine Kvitka (born 1983) earned an MFA in Painting from the Art Academy of Latvia.
aKvit1

aKvit2

aKvit3

aKvit4

aKvit5

aKvit6

aKvit7

aKvit8

aKvit9

From the Music Archives – Part IV of V: Ron Blair

Born 16 September 1948 – Ron Blair, an American musician best known for being the bassist for Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

Mexican painter and muralist Carlos Orduna (born 1946) studied fine art during the early 1960s at the School of Plastic Arts program under the auspices of the National Institute of Fine Arts of Mexico.
aOrd1

aOrd2

aOrd3

aOrd4

aOrd5

aOrd6

aOrd7

aHulme1
“The artist tries to see what there is to be interested in. He has not created something, he has seen something.” – T. E. Hulme, English poet and critic, who was born 16 September 1883.

“Autumn”

A touch of cold in the Autumn night –

I walked abroad,
And saw the ruddy moon lean over a hedge
Like a red-faced farmer.
I did not stop to speak, but nodded,
And round about were the wistful stars
With white faces like town children.
aHulme2

Here is one critic describing the artistry of Dutch sculptor Erwin Meijer: “What young sculptors are still prepared to go to extremes when it comes to technique and finish? Erwin Meijer is a member of that select group. He creates bronzes with the feeling for detail of a violin maker. Anatomical perfection, exquisite detail and supreme quality of casting result in sculptures of sheer dedication without compromise. But this is not the entire story. Nor will this story ever be told, because Erwin Meijer’s sculptures, however well-crafted their detail, ultimately remain unfinished stories. His figures are engrossed in activities, without being aware of the spectator. Meijer portrays them at their moment of inspiration, or as they collect their thoughts or are concentrating upon their surroundings. We are mere witnesses to an intimate moment of which we are no part. The maturity of Erwin Meijer’s sculptures is striking. This is the result of his approach: he works on several sculptures simultaneously in a given period. By switching his attention from one work to another, he repeatedly affords himself a fresh look, which sometimes leads to rigorous changes. Thus, Meijer’s sculptures are allotted ample time to ‘ripen’ into well-balanced, inspired works of art. ”
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

aMeij2

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

aMeij8

aMeij9

aMeij10

From the Music Archives – Part V of V: Antonio Vivaldi

American Art – Part III of V: Tristan Henry-Wilson

Artist Statement: “(I am) an Illustrator that oil paints. I live in Manhattan.
 This is where I chronicle the creation of my art as well as help others learn more about the process of illustration and oil painting.”

aWilson1

aWilson2

aWilson3

aWilson4

aWilson5

aWilson6

aWilson7

aWilson8

aKenyon1
A Poem for Today

“Happiness,”
By Jane Kenyon

There’s just no accounting for happiness,
or the way it turns up like a prodigal
who comes back to the dust at your feet
having squandered a fortune far away.

And how can you not forgive?
You make a feast in honor of what
was lost, and take from its place the finest
garment, which you saved for an occasion
you could not imagine, and you weep night and day
to know that you were not abandoned,
that happiness saved its most extreme form
for you alone.

No, happiness is the uncle you never
knew about, who flies a single-engine plane
onto the grassy landing strip, hitchhikes
into town, and inquires at every door
until he finds you asleep midafternoon
as you so often are during the unmerciful
hours of your despair.

It comes to the monk in his cell.
It comes to the woman sweeping the street
with a birch broom, to the child
whose mother has passed out from drink.
It comes to the lover, to the dog chewing
a sock, to the pusher, to the basketmaker,
and to the clerk stacking cans of carrots
in the night.
It even comes to the boulder
in the perpetual shade of pine barrens,
to rain falling on the open sea,
to the wineglass, weary of holding wine.

Below – Jiji Nantou: “Blooming Happiness”

aKenyon2

American Art – Part IV of V: Shawn Zents

Artist Statement: “To have viewers look through my eye’s at the canvas and to respond to the beauty is my deepest hope and perhaps feel the eternal truths of life.”
aZents1

aZents2

aZents3

aZents4

aZents5

aZents6

aZents7

aOstriker1

A Second Poem for Today

“The Dogs at Live Oak Beach, Santa Cruz,”
By Alicia Ostriker

As if there could be a world
Of absolute innocence
In which we forget ourselves

The owners throw sticks
And half-bald tennis balls
Toward the surf
And the happy dogs leap after them
As if catapulted—

Black dogs, tan dogs,
Tubes of glorious muscle—

Pursuing pleasure
More than obedience
They race, skid to a halt in the wet sand,
Sometimes they’ll plunge straight into
The foaming breakers

Like diving birds, letting the green turbulence
Toss them, until they snap and sink

Teeth into floating wood
Then bound back to their owners
Shining wet, with passionate speed
For nothing,
For absolutely nothing but joy.
aOstriker2

American Art – Part V of V: Kerry Brooks

Artist Statement: ”Through representational art I strive to manipulate the formal constructs of a painting in order to create portraits that reveal the particular character or personality of my subjects, or landscapes that may be imbued with a specific mood or spirituality. I often use stark or simple compositions in order to emphasize the beauty and dignity of my subject.
As the beginning of the twenty-first century experiences a renaissance in representational art, I seek, along with my ‘New Realist’ contemporaries, to continue within the rich tradition of representational art and to transmit ideals such as beauty and truth through my work.”
aBrooks1

aBrooks2

aBrooks3

aBrooks5

aBrooks6

aBrooks7

aBrooks8

aBrooks9

aBrooks10

aBrooks11

aBrooks12

aBrooks13

aBrooks14

aBrooks15

aBrooks16

aChappell1a
A Third Poem for Today

“Narcissus and Echo,”
By Fred Chappell

Shall the water not remember  ‘Ember’
my hand’s slow gesture, tracing above  ‘of’
its mirror my half-imaginary  ‘airy’
portrait? My only belonging  ‘longing’;
is my beauty, which I take  ‘ache’
away and then return, as love ‘of’
teasing playfully the one being  ‘unbeing.’
whose gratitude I treasure  ‘Is your’
moves me. I live apart  ‘heart’
from myself, yet cannot  ‘not’
live apart. In the water’s tone,  ‘stone’?
that brilliant silence, a flower  ‘Hour,’
whispers my name with such slight  ‘light’:
moment, it seems filament of air,  ‘fare’
the world becomes cloudswell.  ‘well.
’

Below – William Waterhouse: “Echo and Narcissus”
David Revoy: “Narcissus and Echo”
Steve Leblanc: “Echo and Narcissus”
Richard Baxter: “Narcissus and Echo”
Kurt Wenner: “Echo and Narcissus”
aChappell1
aChappell2
aChappell3
aChappell4
aChappell5

This entry was posted in Art and Photography, Books, Movies, Music, and Television. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply