Thursday Musings

Musings in Spring:Hermann Hesse

“Home is neither here nor there. Home is within you, or home is nowhere at all.”

Below – Hermann Hesse

Art for Spring – Part I of V: Jang Mee Park (Canadian, contemporary)

Below – “In Some Place”

A Poem for Today

“The Choice”
By William Butler Yeats

The intellect of man is forced to choose
perfection of the life, or of the work,
And if it take the second must refuse
A heavenly mansion, raging in the dark.
When all that story’s finished, what’s the news?
In luck or out the toil has left its mark:
That old perplexity an empty purse,
Or the day’s vanity, the night’s remorse.

Art for Spring – Part II of V: Edward Hopper (American, 1882-1967)

Below – “People in the Sun”

Musings in Spring: George R.R. Martin

“Old stories are like old friends … you have to visit them from time to time.”

Below – Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot: “Woman Reading a Book”

Art for Spring – Part III of V: Jamie Wyeth (American, contemporary)

Below – “Raven”

A Second Poem for Today

“In Emily Dickinson’s Bedroom”
By Lloyd Schwartz

A chilly light pervades the empty room
bringing neither its current nor former inhabitant peace.
Rather, its immaterial lingering infests
both the air inside and what we see of the grass
outside—brittle, brown, as if it wanted to avoid the sun.
Inside, the visitor must be respectful
and polite, evasive without actually telling lies.
Everything here seems hidden—is hidden—not
just the bricked-up chimney and plastered-over doorway. Any
clue—under the wide floorboards, behind the blocked entrance—
to the haunted chambers of a heart? Patches of verse, of
old wallpaper, the main street not yet a street. What industry
motivated those uncanny dashes—these shadows
still eluding our meager efforts to scrutinize.

Art for Spring – Part IV of V: Eugene Titov (Russian, contemporary)

Below – “Dream 2”

Musings in Spring: Amy Leach

“Even in rainier areas, where dust is less inexorable and submits to brooms and rags, it is generally detested, because dust is not organized and is therefore considered aesthetically bankrupt. Our light is not kind to faint diffuse spreading things. Our soft comfortable light flatters carefully organized, formally structured things like wedding cakes with their scrolls and overlapping flounces.
It takes the mortal storms of a star to transform dust into something incandescent. Our dust, shambling and subtractive as it is, would be radiant, if we were close enough to such a star, to that deep and dangerous light, and we would be ravished by the vision—emerald shreds veined in gold, diamond bursts fraught with deep-red flashes, aqua and violet and icy-green astral manifestations, splintery blinking harbor of light, dust as it can be, the quintessence of dust.”

Art for Spring – Part V of V: Alfred Stieglitz (American, 1864-1946)

Below – “Georgia O’Keeffe, 1918” (photograph)

A Third Poem for Today

“Poetry”
By William Stafford

Its door opens near. It’s a shrine
by the road, it’s a flower in the parking lot
of The Pentagon, it says, “Look around,
listen. Feel the air.” It interrupts
international telephone lines with a tune.
When traffic lines jam, it gets out
and dances on the bridge. If great people
get distracted by fame they forget
this essential kind of breathing
and they die inside their gold shell.
When caravans cross deserts
it is the secret treasure hidden under the jewels.

Sometimes commanders take us over, and they
try to impose their whole universe,
how to succeed by daily calculation
I can’t eat that bread.

Contemporary American Art – James Moore

In the words of one writer, “James G. (Jim) Moore was born in Fort Collins, Colorado. Jim was fortunate to have parents who worked hard to expose their children to the wonders of the world through regular trips to the mountains, libraries, museums, church and other places of faith and learning. Art was, since childhood, a passion for Jim.
Having served in Naval Reserves and having completed a tour of duty in Iraq, Jim had the benefit of ship board travel in the South Pacific. Here was an opportunity to see parts of Thailand, Hong Kong, the Philippines and Japan where arts and crafts have a strong and interwoven heritage. Huge temple bells and beautiful, serene Zen gardens in Japan made lasting impressions on what was to become his passion.
Formal education began at the University of New Mexico and was completed at the University of Colorado, completing his BA in 1993 and a Masters in Education in 2004. As an artist and art educator, James has been working professionally in bronze for the last 16 years. Good fortune placed him in Colorado during the boom in sculpting and the sculpture industry in the Loveland, Colorado area. Success of the sculptured bells has taken him from full time instructor to a part-time high school art instructor for a charter school in Greeley Colorado. As of early 2009 Jim will concentrate on his sculpting career and retire completely from teaching.”

Below – “Bass Vessel” (bronze); “Blue Gill Vessel” (bronze); “Independence” (bronze); “Prairie Song” (bronze); “Trout Pot” (bronze); “Kingfisher Vessel” (bronze); “Wild River” (bronze).

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