17 June 2017 – Bothered in Bothell: Part XVI

Musings in Spring: Ann Zwinger

“The question haunted me, and the real answer came, as answers often do, not in the canyon but at an unlikely time and in an unexpected place, flying over the canyon at thirty thousand feet on my way to be a grandmother. My mind on other things, intending only to glance out, the exquisite smallness and delicacy of the river took me completely by surprise. In the hazy light of early morning, the canyon lay shrouded, the river flecked with glints of silver, reduced to a thin line of memory, blurred by a sudden realization that clouded my vision. The astonishing sense of connection with that river and canyon caught me completely unaware, and in a breath I understood the intense, protective loyalty so many people feel for the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. It has to do with truth and beauty and love of this earth, the artifacts of a lifetime and the descant of a canyon wren at dawn.”


Art for Spring – Part I of VI: Phil Lewis (American, contemporary)

Below – “The Flatirons”


Musings in Spring: Lucy Maud Montgomery

“There is such a place as fairyland – but only children can find the way to it. And they do not know that it is fairyland until they have grown so old that they forget the way. One bitter day, when they seek it and cannot find it, they realize what they have lost; and that is the tragedy of life. On that day the gates of Eden are shut behind them and the age of gold is over. Henceforth they must dwell in the common light of common day. Only a few, who remain children at heart, can ever find that fair, lost path again; and blessed are they above mortals. They, and only they, can bring us tidings from that dear country where we once sojourned and from which we must evermore be exiles. The world calls them its singers and poets and artists and story-tellers; but they are just people who have never forgotten the way to fairyland.”


Art for Spring – Part II of VI: Brian Serff (American, contemporary)

Below – “Dodge”


A Poem for Today

“Counting Backwards”
By Linda Pastan

How did I get so old,
I wonder,
contemplating
my 67th birthday.
Dyslexia smiles:
I’m 76 in fact.

There are places
where at 60 they start
counting backwards;
in Japan
they start again
from one.

But the numbers
hardly matter.
It’s the physics
of acceleration I mind,
the way time speeds up
as if it hasn’t guessed

the destination—
where look!
I see my mother
and father bearing a cake,
waiting for me
at the starting line.

Art for Spring – Part III of VI: (Fernando de Jesus Oliviera) Ferjo (Brazilian, contemporary)

Below – “Picasso’s Secret Hallway”


Musings in Spring: Annie Dillard

“What does it feel like to be alive?
Living, you stand under a waterfall. You leave the sleeping shore deliberately; you shed your dusty clothes, pick your barefoot way over the high, slippery rocks, hold your breath, choose your footing, and step into the waterfall. The hard water pelts your skull, bangs in bits on your shoulders and arms. The strong water dashes down beside you and you feel it along your calves and thighs rising roughly backup, up to the roiling surface, full of bubbles that slide up your skin or break on you at full speed. Can you breathe here? Here where the force is the greatest and only the strength of your neck holds the river out of your face. Yes, you can breathe even here. You could learn to live like this. And you can, if you concentrate, even look out at the peaceful far bank where you try to raise your arms. What a racket in your ears, what a scattershot pummeling!
It is time pounding at you, time. Knowing you are alive is watching on every side your generation’s short time falling away as fast as rivers drop through air, and feeling it hit.”


Art for Spring – Part IV of VI: James Fetherolf (American, 1925-1994)

Below – “Near Hopi Point” (oil on canvas)


Musings in Spring: John Muir

“Down through the middle of the Valley flows the crystal Merced, River of Mercy, peacefully quiet, reflecting lilies and trees and the onlooking rocks; things frail and fleeting and types of endurance meeting here and blending in countless forms, as if into this one mountain mansion Nature had gathered her choicest treasures, to draw her lovers into close and confiding communion with her.”


Art for Spring – Part V of VI: Carole Feuerman (American, contemporary)

Below – “Shower Portrait” (print: silkscreen on canvas with diamond dust)


A Second Poem for Today

“After a Rainstorm”
By Robert Wrigley

Because I have come to the fence at night,
the horses arrive also from their ancient stable.
They let me stroke their long faces, and I note
in the light of the now-merging moon

how they, a Morgan and a Quarter, have been
by shake-guttered raindrops
spotted around their rumps and thus made
Appaloosas, the ancestral horses of this place.

Maybe because it is night, they are nervous,
or maybe because they too sense
what they have become, they seem
to be waiting for me to say something

to whatever ancient spirits might still abide here,
that they might awaken from this strange dream,
in which there are fences and stables and a man
who doesn’t know a single word they understand.


Art for Spring – Part V of VI: Ivan Filichev (Russian, contemporary)

Below – “Dairymaid”


Musings in Spring: Loren Eiseley

“Every time we walk along a beach some ancient urge disturbs us so that we find ourselves shedding shoes and garments or scavenging among seaweed and whitened timbers like the homesick refugees of a long war.”


Contemporary American Art – Aaron Fink

In the words of one writer, “He was born in 1955. Aaron Fink received a BFA from the Maryland Institute, College of Art (1977) and an MFA from Yale University School of Art and Architecture (1979). For the past two decades, he has composed powerful two and three-dimensional compositions that depict quotidian objects such as fruit, vegetables and ice cream scoops on both monumental and intimate scales. To achieve this, the artist works with a wide range of materials, which include such diverse media as oil, prints, monotypes, clay, plaster, and fiberglass.”

Below – “Homer”; “Dark Venus”; “Poker Player”; “Cherry Tomato”; “Vanilla Dish”; “Pipe.”

This entry was posted in Art and Photography, Books, Movies, Music, and Television, Opinion. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply