12 August 2017 – Beleaguered in Bothell

Musings in Summer: C W Newman

“We commonly confuse love with the strong emotions most often associated with it, such as joy, attachment, lust, infatuation, pleasure, pain, fear, and hope, to name a few. But, love is not a feeling; love itself is an action. There are countless emotions and beliefs that can cause us to love. Love is the willing giving of self to another living being. Love is giving the life, time, energy, and resources that we would normally give or use for our self to someone else. Love is an action that enhances the well-being of another living being.”

Art for Summer – Part I of VI: Gustavo Montoya (Mexican, 1905-2003)

Below – “Ninas con Paraguas”


Musings in Summer: Kate DiCamillo

“You can always trust a dog that likes peanut butter.”

Art for Summer – Part II of VI: Robert Moore (American, contemporary)

Below – “Winter Haystack”


Musings in Summer: Shannon Mullen

“How can any of us even know what to believe anymore? Our culture’s full of so much phoniness and deception. Companies advertise products to make us believe that we will be more beautiful, more healthy, or live longer by consuming their products. We are seduced by lovers who feed their porn addictions when we’re asleep. We’re taught to believe that if we work hard and take risks, that we can achieve our dreams, yet youth unemployment is the highest it’s been in decades. Fairytales tell us that true love exists, but half of all marriages end in divorce.”

Art for Summer – Part III of VI: Thomas Moran (British, 1837-1926)

Below – “Grand Canyon of Arizona from Hermit Rim Road”

A Poem for Today

“Grasses”
By Heather Allen

So still at heart,
They respond like water
To the slightest breeze,
Rippling as one body,

And, as one mind,
Bend continually
To listen:
The perfect confidants,

They keep to themselves,
A web of trails and nests,
Burrows and hidden entrances—
Do not reveal

Those camouflaged in stillness
From the circling hawks,
Or crouched and breathless
At the passing of the fox.

Art for Summer – Part IV of VI: Victor Mordasov (Belarusian, contemporary)

Below – “Plums on Wood”

Musings in Summer: Mary Oliver

“I believe in kindness. Also in mischief. Also in singing, especially when singing is not necessarily prescribed.”

Below – Jan Esmann: “Singing woman at a rocky coast”

Art for Summer – Part V of VI: Malcolm Morley (British, contemporary)

Below – “Sky Above, Mud Below”


Musings in Summer: Paul Bowles

“Death is always on the way, but the fact that you don’t know when it will arrive seems to take away from the finiteness of life. It’s that terrible precision that we hate so much. But because we don’t know, we get to think of life as an inexhaustible well. Yet everything happens a certain number of times, and a very small number, really. How many more times will you remember a certain afternoon of your childhood, some afternoon that’s so deeply a part of your being that you can’t even conceive of your life without it? Perhaps four or five times more. Perhaps not even. How many more times will you watch the full moon rise? Perhaps twenty. And yet it all seems limitless.”

Art for Summer – Part VI of VI: Lena Moross (American, contemporary)

Below – “Reclining Woman”


Musings in Summer: James Agee

“And somewhat as in blind night, on a mild sea, a sailor may be made aware of an iceberg, fanged and mortal, bearing invisibly near, by the unwarned charm of its breath, nothingness now revealed itself: that permanent night upon which the stars in their expiring generations are less than the glinting of gnats, and nebulae, more trivial than winter breath; that darkness in which eternity lies bent and pale, a dead snake in a jar, and infinity is the sparkling of a wren blown out to sea; that inconceivable chasm of invulnerable silence in which cataclysms of galaxies rave mute as amber.”

Indian Art – Kaiko Moti (1921-1989)

In the words of one writer, “Moti was born Kaikobad Motiwalla in Bombay, India in 1921. He began private design classes at age fourteen and, between the years 1939 and 1946, he attended the Bombay School of Fine Arts. Moti moved to London, England in 1946 and continued his art studies at the Slade School of Art of the University College receiving his Masters Degree in painting and sculpture. In 1950 Moti settled into becoming a permanent resident of Paris. He attended the Academie de la Grand Chaumiere and studied sculpture with Ossip Zadkine at his atelier. In 1952, Moti began studying engraving with Stanley William Hayter at Atelier 17 where he pioneered many techniques in the field of viscosity printing. Moti began exhibiting in 1953, and showed internationally at the Venice Biennale, the Bibliotheque Nationale, the Basel Art Fair, the Art Expo and the New York Public Library. He won various awards and is represented in the permanent collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Paris Musee d’Art Moderne and Bibliotheque Nationale. Moti was an honorary member of the Academy of Florence.”

Below – “Owl Light”; Untitled Animal Etching; “Falcon”; “Orange Blossoms in Vase”; “Lioness”; “Forest.”

Musings in Summer: May Sarton

“One has only to set a loved human being against the fact that we are all in peril all the time to get back a sense of proportion. What does anything matter compared to the reality of love and its span, so brief at best, maintained against such odds?”

Contemporary American Art – Robert McGinnis

In the words of one writer, “Robert Edward McGinnis (born February 3, 1926) is an American artist and illustrator. McGinnis is known for his illustrations of more than 1,200 paperback book covers, and over 40 movie posters, including Breakfast at Tiffanys (his first film poster assignment), Barbarella, and several James Bond and Matt Helm films.”

Below – “Gold Dust”; “Indian Creek in Winter”; “Benita”; “Love Letter”; “Ohio Farmstead”; “Rose Garland.”

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