Sentient in San Francisco – 9 March 2019

This Date in Art History: Died 9 March1925 – Willard Metcalf, an American painter.

Below – “Cornish Hills”; “On the Suffolk Coast”; “The Ten Cent Breakfast”; “May Night”; “My Wife and Daughter”; “Indian Summer, Vermont.”

Musings in Winter: William Stafford

“Once we have tasted far streams, touched the gold, found some limit beyond the waterfall, a season changes and we come back changed but safe, quiet, grateful.”

Below – John Singer Sargent: “Man Seated by a Stream”

This Date in Art History: Born 9 March 1948 – Eric Fischl, an American painter and sculptor.

Below – Untitled (Brice in Pink Shirt); “Beach Scene with Pink Hat”; “The Raft”; “Scenes From Late Paradise The Parade”; Untitled; “On the Stairs of the Temple.”

This Date in Literary History: Died 9 March 1994 – Charles Bukowski, an American poet, novelist, and short story writer.

“For the Foxes”
by Charles Bukowski

Don’t feel sorry for me.
I am a competent,
satisfied human being.

be sorry for the others
who
fidget
complain

who
constantly
rearrange their
lives
like
furniture.

juggling mates
and
attitudes

their
confusion is
constant

and it will
touch
whoever they
deal with.

beware of them:
one of their
key words is
‘love.’

and beware those who
only take
instructions from their
God

for they have
failed completely to live their own
lives.

don’t feel sorry for me
because I am alone

for even
at the most terrible
moments
humor
is my
companion.

I am a dog walking
backwards

I am a broken
banjo

I am a telephone wire
strung up in
Toledo, Ohio

I am a man
eating a meal
this night
in the month of
September.

put your sympathy
aside.
they say
water held up
Christ:
to come
through
you better be
nearly as
lucky.


Contemporary Australian Art – Ian Bent

Below – “Figures in the Park”; “Signal Box”; “Figure on a Beach”; “Double Twist”; “Large Hook”; “Cyclone Wire Twist.”

This Date in Literary History: Born 9 March 1892 – Vita Sackville-West, an English author, poet, and gardener.

Some quotes from the work of Vita Sackville-West:

“The more one gardens, the more one learns; And the more one learns, the more one realizes how little one knows.”
“The most noteworthy thing about gardeners is that they are always optimistic, always enterprising, and never satisfied. They always look forward to doing something better than they have ever done before.”
“I have come to the conclusion, after many years of sometimes sad experience, that you cannot come to any conclusion at all.”
“Days I enjoy are days when nothing happens,
When I have no engagements written on my block,
When no one comes to disturb my inward peace,
When no one comes to take me away from myself
And turn me into a patchwork, a jig-saw puzzle,
A broken mirror that once gave a whole reflection,
Being so contrived that it takes too long a time
To get myself back to myself when they have gone.”
“A good start in life is as important to plants as it is to children: they must develop strong roots in a congenial soil, otherwise they will never make the growth that will serve them richly according to their needs in their adult life.”
“She walks in the loveliness she made,
Between the apple-blossom and the water–
She walks among the patterned pied brocade,
Each flower her son, and every tree her daughter.”


Contemporary American Art – Richard Whitney

Below – “Abandoned Orchard”; “Autumn Storm”; “End of an Era”; “Spring Thaw”; “Gathering Flowers”; “Burst of Autumn.”

A Poem for Today

“Creek-Song”
by Shari Wagner

It begins in a cow lane
with bees and white clover,
courses along corn, rushes
‘accelerando’ against rocks.
It rises to a teetering pitch
as I cross a shaky tree-bridge,
syncopates a riff
over the dissonance
of trash—derelict icebox
with a missing door,
mohair loveseat sinking
into thistle. It winds through green
adder’s mouth, faint as the bells
of Holsteins heading home.
Blue shadows lengthen,
but the undertow
of a harmony pulls me on
through raspy Joe-pye-weed
and staccato-barbed fence.
It hums in a culvert
beneath cars, then empties
into a river that flows oboe-deep
past Indian dance ground, waterwheel
and town, past the bleached
stones in the churchyard,
the darkening hill.

Below – Margaret Chadwick-Juner: “Muhlfield’s Creek”

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