Beleaguered in Bothell – Part V

Musings in Summer: Henry David Thoreau

“I have spent many an hour, when I was younger, floating over its surface as the zephyr willed, having paddled my boat to the middle, and lying on my back across the seats, in a summer forenoon, dreaming awake, until I was aroused by the boat touching the sand, and I arose to see what shore my fates had impelled me to; days when idleness was the most attractive and productive industry. Many a forenoon have I stolen away, preferring to spend thus the most valued part of the day; for I was rich, if not in money, in sunny hours and summer days, and spent them lavishly”

Below – Jessie Dodington: “On the Pond”


Art for Summer – Part I of VI: Byron Galvez (Mexican, 1941-2009)

Below – “Reclining Nude”

Musings in Summer: Tiffany Madison

“Modern man is full of platitudes about living life to its fullest, with catchy keychain phrases and little plaques for kitchen walls. But if you’ve never retreated to the solitude of a dark room and listened to Beethoven’s Ninth from start to finish, you know nothing. For music is a transcendental exploration of human emotion and experience, the very fabric of life in its purest form. And the Ninth our greatest musical achievement.”


Art for Summer – Part II of VI: Bernard Gantner (French, contemporary)

Below – Untitled Landscape

A Poem for Today

“Two Gates”
By Denise Low

I look through glass and see a young woman
of twenty, washing dishes, and the window
turns into a painting. She is myself thirty years ago.
She holds the same blue bowls and brass teapot
I still own. I see her outline against lamplight;
she knows only her side of the pane. The porch
where I stand is empty. Sunlight fades. I hear
water run in the sink as she lowers her head,
blind to the future. She does not imagine I exist.

I step forward for a better look and she dissolves
into lumber and paint. A gate I passed through
to the next life loses shape. Once more I stand
squared into the present, among maple trees
and scissor-tailed birds, in a garden, almost
a mother to that faint, distant woman.

Art for Summer – Part III of VI: Jerry Garcia (American, 1942-1995)

Below – “Landscape”


Musings in Summer: Ambrose Bierce

“Academe, n.: An ancient school where morality and philosophy were taught. Academy, n.: A modern school where football is taught.”

Art for Summer – Part IV of VI: Danny Garcia (American, 1929-2012)

Below – Untitled Cypress (California); “Artist Wife Nude”

 


A Second Poem for Today

“Off A Side Road Near Staunton”
By Stanley Plumly

Some nothing afternoon, no one anywhere,
an early autumn stillness in the air,
the kind of empty day you fill by taking in
the full size of the valley and its layers leading
slowly to the Blue Ridge, the quality of country,
if you stand here long enough, you could stay
for, step into, the way a landscape, even on a wall,
pulls you in, one field at a time, pasture and fall
meadow, high above the harvest, perfect
to the tree line, then spirit clouds and intermittent
sunlit smoky rain riding the tops of the mountains,
though you could walk until it’s dark and not reach those rains—
you could walk the rest of the day into the picture
and not know why, at any given moment, you’re there.

Art for Summer – Part V of VI: Tammy Garcia (American, contemporary)

Below – “Distant Visitor” (bronze)

Musings in Summer: Annie Dillard

“I cannot cause light; the most I can do is try to put myself in the path of its beam.”


Art for Summer – Part VI of VI: Barbara Swan (American, 1922-2003)

Below – “Reflected Card Player”

Musings in Summer: Jack London

“With the aurora borealis flaming coldly overhead, or the stars leaping in the frost dance, and the land numb and frozen under its pall of snow, this song of the huskies might have been the defiance of life, only it was pitched in minor key, with long-drawn wailings and half-sobs, and was more the pleading of life, the articulate travail of existence.”

Below – Chuck Black: “Sled Dogs”

Contemporary American Art – Frank Gallo

In the words of one writer, “Frank Gallo has worked primarily from the human form. Frank Gallo studied art from 1951 to 1959 at the University of Toledo, Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan and the State University of Iowa. In the late 1950s, Frank Gallo began to use the material polyester resin reinforced with fiberglass that gives his sculpture a viscous finish. Although he is noted for his studies of women, some of whom are fancifully and colorfully clad, Frank Gallo has also made sculptures of men, including Abraham Lincoln. Frank Gallos’ work is often mildly erotic, with elongated figures that may sit or recline in postures suggesting extremes of boredom or self-involvement.”

Below – “Primavera” (epoxy resin sculpture); Untitled; “Angela” (cast paper sculpture); “Galetea” (bronze); “Romantic Novel” (epoxy resin sculpture); “Flowers in Her Hair.”

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