26 July 2017 – Beleaguered in Bothell

Musings in Summer: Antoine de Saint-Exupery

“Let your dream devour your life, not your life devour your dream.”

Art for Summer – Part I of V: David Lemon (American, contemporary)

Below – “Sassy” (bronze); “Feathers in the Wind” (bronze)

Musings in Summer: John Grogan

“A person can learn a lot from a dog, even a loopy one like ours. Marley taught me about living each day with unbridled exuberance and joy, about seizing the moment and following your heart. He taught me to appreciate the simple things-a walk in the woods, a fresh snowfall, a nap in a shaft of winter sunlight. And as he grew old and achy, he taught me about optimism in the face of adversity. Mostly, he taught me about friendship and selflessness and, above all else, unwavering loyalty.”

Art for Summer – Part II of V: Tamara de Lempicka (Polish, 1898-1980)

Below – “Printemps”; “Lady in Lace”; “Femme Blue a la Guitare”


A Poem for Today

“Grubbing”
By Gabriel Spera

The jay’s up early, and attacks the lawn
with something of that fervor and despair
of one whose keys are not where they always are,
checking the same spots over and again
till something new or overlooked appears—
an armored pillbug, or a husk of grain.
He flits with it home, where his mate beds down,
her stern tail feathers jutting from the nest
like a spoon handle from a breakfast bowl.
The quickest lover’s peck, and he’s paroled
again to stalk the sodgrass, cockheaded, obsessed.
He must get something from his selfless work—
joy, or reprieve, or a satisfying sense
of obligation dutifully dispensed.
Unless, of course, he’s just a bird, with beaks—
too many beaks—to fill, in no way possessed
of traits or demons humans might devise,
his dark not filled with could-have-beens and whys.


Art for Summer – Part III of V: Michael Leu (Taiwanese, contemporary)

Below – “Window”

Musings in Summer: Charles Baxter

“There is such a thing as the poetry of a mistake, and when you say, ‘Mistakes were made,’ you deprive an action of its poetry, and you sound like a weasel.”

Art for Summer – Part IV of V: Hong Leung (Chinese, contemporary)

Below – “San Francisco at Dusk”

Musings in Summer: Carl Sagan

“How is it that hardly any major religion has looked at science and concluded, ‘This is better than we thought! The Universe is much bigger than our prophets said, grander, more subtle, more elegant?’ Instead they say, ‘No, no, no! My god is a little god, and I want him to stay that way.’ A religion, old or new, that stressed the magnificence of the Universe as revealed by modern science might be able to draw forth reserves of reverence and awe hardly tapped by the conventional faiths.”

Art for Summer – V of V: Thomas Leung (Chinese, contemporary)

Below – “Alpine Glow”


Musings in Summer: Wendell Berry

“The sunlight now lay over the valley perfectly still. I went over to the graveyard beside the church and found them under the old cedars… I am finding it a little hard to say that I felt them resting there, but I did. I felt their completeness as whatever they had been in the world.
I knew I had come there out of kindness, theirs and mine. The grief that came to me then was nothing like the grief I had felt for myself alone… This grief had something in it of generosity, some nearness to joy. In a strange way it added to me what I had lost. I saw that, for me, this country would always be populated with presences and absences, presences of absences, the living and the dead. The world as it is would always be a reminder of the world that was, and of the world that is to come.”

Contemporary French Art – Linda LeKinff

In the words of one writer, “In the bold and vibrant creations of Linda LeKinff, elements of her beloved masters permeate her highly original visions, embuing them with a force greater than the sum of their parts. Yet, when a body of her work is gathered for an exhibition, there is no mistaking that such a collection is a coherent outpouring of one very focused and original mind, drawing on a diverse treasure of artistic influences and personal experiences. Drawing from her travels, dreams, reading and imagination, Linda Le Kinff has taken her place among contemporary artists whose work frees us from the mundane reality of everyday life, not with elaborate fantasy but with a sure-handed rendering of beauty and elegance in line with her personal view on painting.”

Below – “Sweet Lady #3”; “Femme Gauge”; “Florilege”; “Fleurs, Fleurs, Fleurs”; “Hawaii”; “Petit Nu Discret.”


Musings in Summer: Peter Matthiessen

“Left alone, I am overtaken by the northern void-no wind, no cloud, no track, no bird, only the crystal crescents between peaks, the ringing monuments of rock that, freed from the talons of ice and snow, thrust an implacable being into the blue. In the early light, the rock shadows on the snow are sharp; in the tension between light and dark is the power of the universe. This stillness to which all returns, this is reality, and soul and sanity have no more meaning than a gust of snow; such transience and insignificance are exalting, terrifying, all at once…Snow mountains, more than sea or sky, serve as a mirror to one’s own true being, utterly still, utterly clear, a void, an Emptiness without life or sound that carries in Itself all life, all sound.”

Mexican/American Art – Jesus Leuus (1948-2008: born and raised in El Paso, Texas; moved with his family to Mexico at the age of 14)

In the words of one writer, “He studied painting and sculpture under the guidance of Augustine Lazo, Rodrigues Lozano, Orozco Romero and Alfredo Zalce. Inspired greatly by the ancient designs of the Aztecs and Mayans, Leuus has developed a distinctive style, based on ancient history but unmistakably Contemporary and Modern. He paints monumental figures that are figured to express love, sadness, the rich and the poor, and life and death . Working preferably on Masonite and Linen, Jesus Leuus composes his rich colors by hand mixing the acrylic pigment. He uses a marble dust mixed with the acrylic paint to achieve texture. His recognizable style reflects a well balanced composition of minimalized color, lines and figures.”

Below – “Lovers”; Couple Seated”; “Women and Child”; “Hombre con Violin”; “Mother and Child with Watermelon”; “Ninas.”

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