Sentient in Seattle – 23 April 2018

Musings in Spring: Ellen Glasgow

“The older I grow the more earnestly I feel that the few joys of childhood are the best that life has to give.”

Below – Stephen S. Yaeger: “Children Playing at a Pond”

This Date in Art History: Born 23 April 1916 – Yiannis Moralis, a Greek painter: Part I of II

Below – “By the Outdoor Photographer”; “Two Girl Friends”; “Figure”; “Portrait of Fani”; “Three Women Sitting”; “Female Nude.”

Worth a Thousand Words: A desert beach, Namibia.

This Date in Art History: Born 23 April 1916 – Yiannis Moralis, a Greek painter: Part II of II

Below – “Still Life with Shoes”; “Summer”; “Funerary Composition I”; “Pregnant Woman”; “Nude”; “Two Girls Sitting.”

Musings in Spring: Cassandra Clare

“There’s something about a place you’ve been with someone you love. It takes on a meaning in your mind. It becomes more than a place. It becomes a distillation of what you felt for each other. The moments you spend in a place with someone… they become part of its bricks and mortar. Part of its soul.”

This Date in Art History: Born 23 April 1943 – Frans Koppelaar, a Dutch painter.

Below – “Backlight Langestraat”; “Sunset at Katwijk”; “Brown eyed Girl”; “Early Spring at Realengracht”; “Westerdok in winter”; “Backlight at Singel.”

Remembering an Influential Writer on the Date of His Death: Died 23 April 1850 – Willian Wordsworth, an English Romantic poet and co-author (with Samuel Coleridge) of “Lyrical Ballads.”

“The World is Too Much With Us”
by William Wordsworth

The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;—
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;
For this, for everything, we are out of tune;
It moves us not. Great God! I’d rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreathèd horn.

Below – Benjamin Robert Haydon: “Portrait of William Wordsworth”; a drawing of Triton.


American Art – Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859-1937): Part I of II

In the words of one writer, “Henry Ossawa Tanner was an American artist and the first African-American painter to gain international acclaim. Tanner moved to Paris, France, in 1891 to study, and continued to live there after being accepted in French artistic circles.”
Below – “Spinning by Firelight”; “Gateway, Tangier”; “The Arch”; “The Banjo Lesson”; “The Seine”; “Fishermen at Sea.”


Musings in Spring: John Muir

“Between every two pine trees there is a door leading to a new way of life.”


American Art – Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859-1937): Part II of II

In the words of one writer, “Henry Ossawa Tanner was an American artist and the first African-American painter to gain international acclaim. Tanner moved to Paris, France, in 1891 to study, and continued to live there after being accepted in French artistic circles.”
Below – “Sand Dunes at Sunset – Atlantic City”; “The Young Sabot Maker”; “Coastal Landscape, France”; “View of the Seine, looking toward Nortre Dame”; “A View of Fez”; “Daniel in the Lions’ Den (This painting was accepted into the 1896 Salon, Paris).

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