Sentient in San Francisco – 31 March 2019

This Date in Art History: Born 31 March 1835 – John La Farge, an American painter: Part I of II.

Below – “Girls Carrying a Canoe, Vaiala in Samoa”; Diadem Mountain at Sunset, Tahiti”; “Centauress”; “The Great Statue of Amida Buddha at Kamakura”; “Portrait of Faase, the Taupo of the Fagaloa Bay, Samoa”; “Paradise Valley.”


This Date in Literary History: Born 31 March 1621 – Andrew Marvell, an English poet.

“To His Coy Mistess”
by Andrew Marvell

Had we but world enough and time,
This coyness, lady, were no crime.
We would sit down, and think which way
To walk, and pass our long love’s day.
Thou by the Indian Ganges’ side
Shouldst rubies find; I by the tide
Of Humber would complain. I would
Love you ten years before the flood,
And you should, if you please, refuse
Till the conversion of the Jews.
My vegetable love should grow
Vaster than empires and more slow;
An hundred years should go to praise
Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze;
Two hundred to adore each breast,
But thirty thousand to the rest;
An age at least to every part,
And the last age should show your heart.
For, lady, you deserve this state,
Nor would I love at lower rate.
But at my back I always hear
Time’s wingèd chariot hurrying near;
And yonder all before us lie
Deserts of vast eternity.
Thy beauty shall no more be found;
Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound
My echoing song; then worms shall try
That long-preserved virginity,
And your quaint honour turn to dust,
And into ashes all my lust;
The grave’s a fine and private place,
But none, I think, do there embrace.
Now therefore, while the youthful hue
Sits on thy skin like morning dew,
And while thy willing soul transpires
At every pore with instant fires,
Now let us sport us while we may,
And now, like amorous birds of prey,
Rather at once our time devour
Than languish in his slow-chapped power.
Let us roll all our strength and all
Our sweetness up into one ball,
And tear our pleasures with rough strife
Through the iron gates of life:
Thus, though we cannot make our sun
Stand still, yet we will make him run.

Below – William Adolphe Bouguereau: “The Proposal”


This Date in Art History: Born 31 March 1835 – John La Farge, an American painter: Part II of II.

Below – “At Sunrise”; “Avenue to the Temple of Iyeyasu, Nikko, Mid-Day Study”; “A Bridle Path in Tahiti”; “Nocturne”; “After the Bath – a Memory of the South Seas.”

 

This Date in Literary History: Died 31 March 1855 – Charlotte Bronte, an English novelist, poet, and author of “Jane Eyre.”

Some quotes from the work of Charlotte Bronte:

“Crying does not indicate that you are weak. Since birth, it has always been a sign that you are alive.”
“Better to try all things and find all empty, than to try nothing and leave your life a blank.”
“Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity, or registering wrongs.”
“There is no happiness like that of being loved by your fellow creatures, and feeling that your presence is an addition to their comfort.”
“Life is so constructed, that the event does not, cannot, will not, match the expectation.”
“I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will.”
“I would always rather be happy than dignified.”

This Date in Art History: Died 31 March 2014 – Roger Somville, a Belgian painter.

Below – “Young Man”; “Woman with hat”; “The Parade”; “Un certain regard”; “Woman”; “The Painter.”


This Date in Literary History: Born 31 March 1809 – Edward FitzGerald, an English poet and translator. Fitzgerald produced the first and most famous translation of “The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.”

Below – Four stanzas from “The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam”:

A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread–and Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness
Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!

Some for the Glories of This World; and some
Sigh for the Prophet’s Paradise to come;
Ah, take the Cash, and let the Credit go,
Nor heed the rumble of a distant Drum!

Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend,
Before we too into the Dust descend;
Dust unto Dust, and under Dust to lie,
Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and–sans End!

Come, fill the Cup, and in the Fire of Spring

The Winter Garment of Repentance fling:

The Bird of Time has but a little way

To fly–and Lo! the Bird is on the Wing.


Contemporary Italian Art – Luigi Quarta: Part I of II.

In the words of one writer, “In 2012 a friend convinced him to start a basic course in digital photography. He started this course as a hobby, two years later he continued with more advanced courses, finally, that hobby became his passion and, these days his profession. In his photographic vision, he represents a fantastic journey in a parallel world. He uses as an instrument of expression, combining different techniques to evoke the mystery and hidden meaning behind physical objects. Luigi’s strange creations tap into an unknown world. Words will not do justice to the magic found behind Luigi’s surreal pieces. “

Below – “The silence of the fog”; “The Flamingo and the Moon”; “Hummingbird”; “The eye of the butterfly”; “Fallen Angel”; “Fallen Angel II.”


This Date in Literary History: Born 31 March 1914 – Octavio Paz, a Mexican poet and recipient of the 1990 Nobel Prize in Literature.

“No More Cliches”
by Octavio Paz

Beautiful face
That like a daisy opens its petals to the sun
So do you
Open your face to me as I turn the page.

Enchanting smile
Any man would be under your spell,
Oh, beauty of a magazine.

How many poems have been written to you?
How many Dantes have written to you, Beatrice?
To your obsessive illusion
To you manufacture fantasy.

But today I won’t make one more Cliché
And write this poem to you.
No, no more clichés.

This poem is dedicated to those women
Whose beauty is in their charm,
In their intelligence,
In their character,
Not on their fabricated looks.

This poem is to you women,
That like a Shahrazade wake up
Everyday with a new story to tell,
A story that sings for change
That hopes for battles:
Battles for the love of the united flesh
Battles for passions aroused by a new day
Battle for the neglected rights
Or just battles to survive one more night.

Yes, to you women in a world of pain
To you, bright star in this ever-spending universe
To you, fighter of a thousand-and-one fights
To you, friend of my heart.

From now on, my head won’t look down to a magazine
Rather, it will contemplate the night
And its bright stars,
And so, no more clichés.

Below – Heatherlee Chan: “Starry Night Sky and Girl”


Contemporary Italian Art – Luigi Quarta: Part II of II.

In the words of one writer, “In 2012 a friend convinced him to start a basic course in digital photography. He started this course as a hobby, two years later he continued with more advanced courses, finally, that hobby became his passion and, these days his profession. In his photographic vision, he represents a fantastic journey in a parallel world. He uses as an instrument of expression, combining different techniques to evoke the mystery and hidden meaning behind physical objects. Luigi’s strange creations tap into an unknown world. Words will not do justice to the magic found behind Luigi’s surreal pieces. “

Below – “Dreaming”; “Moonlight”; “I’m Winter”; “The new Nuclear”; “The flight of hummingbirds.”

This Date in Literary History: Born 31 March 1925 – John Fowles, an English novelist and author of “The Magus.”

Some quotes from the work of John Fowles:

“The profoundest distances are never geographical.”
“One of the great fallacies of our time is that the Nazis rose to power because they imposed order on chaos. Precisely the opposite is true – they were successful because they imposed chaos on order. They tore up the commandments, they denied the super-ego, what you will. They said, ‘You may persecute the minority, you may kill, you may torture, you may couple and breed without love.” They offered humanity all its great temptations. Nothing is true, everything is permitted.’”
“We all want things we can’t have. Being a decent human being is accepting that.”
“Time is not a road – it is a room.”
“There comes a time in each life like a point of fulcrum. At that time you must accept yourself. It is not any more what you will become. It is what you are and always will be.”
“Another reason I think the novel will survive is that the reader has to work in a novel. In a film, you are presented with someone else’s imagination exactly bodied out. The marvelous thing about a novel is that every reader will imagine even the very simplest sentence slightly differently.”
“I hate the uneducated and the ignorant. I hate the pompous and the phoney. I hate the jealous and the resentful. I hate the crabbed and mean and the petty. I hate all ordinary dull little people who aren’t ashamed of being dull and little.”
“In some mysterious way woods have never seemed to me to be static things. In physical terms, I move through them; yet in metaphysical ones, they seem to move through me.”

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