Sentient in San Francisco – 23 April 2019

This Date in Art History: Born 23 April 1916 – Yiannis Moralis, a Greek painter.

Below – “Girl Untying Her Sandal”; “Erotic”; “Sitting Figure”; “Erotic”; “Summer”; “Pleine Lune.”


This Date in Literary History: Died 23 April 1616 – William Shakespeare, an English playwright and poet: Part I of II.

Some quotes from the work of William Shakespeare:

“What a terrible era in which idiots govern the blind.”
“Don’t waste your love on somebody, who doesn’t value it.”
“I would challenge you to a battle of wits, but I see you are unarmed!”
“Love does not see with the eyes, but with the soul.”
“Tears water our growth.”
“The empty vessel makes the loudest sound.”
“To be, or not to be, that is the question: Whether ’tis Nobler in the mind to suffer The Slings and Arrows of outrageous Fortune, Or to take Arms against a Sea of troubles, And by opposing end them: to die, to sleep No more; and by a sleep, to say we end The Heart-ache, and the thousand Natural shocks That Flesh is heir to? ‘Tis a consummation Devoutly to be wished. To die to sleep, To sleep, perchance to Dream; Aye, there’s the rub.”


Contemporary Swedish Art – Yuanyuan Liu: Part I of II.

Below – “Seascape”; “Winter light”; “morning flower”; “Flowers”; “Summer walking”; “Summer light.”


This Date in Literary History: Died 23 April 1616 – William Shakespeare, an English playwright and poet: Part II of II.

“That time of year thou mayest in me behold (Sonnet 73)”

That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou see’st the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west;
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see’st the glowing of such fire,
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the deathbed whereon it must expire,
Consumed with that which it was nourished by.
This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well which thou must leave ere long.


Contemporary Swedish Art – Yuanyuan Liu: Part II of II.

Below – “The view of the sea”; “Winter landscape”; “Seascape.”


Musings in Spring: Tom Robbins

“Our greatest human adventure is the evolution of consciousness. We are in this life to enlarge the soul, liberate the spirit, and light up the brain.”

Contemporary American Art – Fabio Caruzzi: Part I of II.

Below – “Empowering #5”; “London Ravers #13”; “Lazy Sunday Afternoon in Santa Barbara #5”; “Silent Afternoon”; “Lifestyle #2.”

This Date in Literary History: Died 23 April 1850 – William Wordsworth, and English poet and author: Part I of II.

Some quotes from the work of William Wordsworth:

“With an eye made quiet by the power of harmony, and the deep power of joy, we see into the life of things.”
“Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.”
“I wandered lonely as a cloud/ That floats on high o’er vales and hills/ When all at once I saw a crowd/ A host of golden daffodils/ Beside the lake beneath the trees/ Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.”
“That best portion of a man’s life, his little, nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and love.”
“Habit rules the unreflecting herd.”
“Open-mindedness is the harvest of a quiet eye.”
“My heart leaps up when I behold
A rainbow in the sky:
So was it when my life began;
So is it now I am a man;
So be it when I shall grow old,
Or let me die!
The Child is father of the Man;
I could wish my days to be
Bound each to each by natural piety.”
“That though the radiance which was once so bright be now forever taken from my sight. Though nothing can bring back the hour of splendor in the grass, glory in the flower. We will grieve not, rather find strength in what remains behind.”

Contemporary American Art – Fabio Caruzzi: Part II of II.

Below – “Reading in Downtown LA”; “Looking Back to Venice Beach”; “Unemployment #10”; “I am lovin’ it.”

This Date in Literary History: Died 23 April 1850 – William Wordsworth, and English poet and author: Part II of II.

“The World Is Too Much With Us”
by William Wordsworth

The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;—
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;
For this, for everything, we are out of tune;
It moves us not. Great God! I’d rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreathèd horn.

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