Sentient in San Francisco – 24 April 2019

This Date in Art History: Died 24 April 1938 – George Grey Barnard, an American sculptor.

Below – “Struggle of the Two Natures in Man”; “Maidenhood”; “The Great God Pan”; “Solitude (Adam and Eve).”

This Date in Literary History: Died 24 April 1942 – Lucy Maud Montgomery, a Canadian author best known for a series of novels beginning in 1938 with “Anne of Green Gables.”

Some quotes from the work of Lucy Maud Montgomery:

“Some people go through life trying to find out what the world holds for them only to find out too late that it’s what they bring to the world that really counts.”
“We should regret our mistakes and learn from them, but never carry them forward into the future with us.”
“Truth exists, only lies have to be invented.”
“There is so much in the world for us all if we only have the eyes to see it, and the heart to love it, and the hand to gather it to ourselves–so much in men and women, so much in art and literature, so much everywhere in which to delight, and for which to be thankful.”
“Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.”
“Tomorrow is always fresh, with no mistakes in it.”
“There isn’t any such thing as an ordinary life.”
“It was November–the month of crimson sunsets, parting birds, deep, sad hymns of the sea, passionate wind-songs in the pines. Anne roamed through the pineland alleys in the park and, as she said, let that great sweeping wind blow the fogs out of her soul.”
“Everything is new in the spring. Springs themselves are always so new, too. No spring is ever just like any other spring. It always has something of its own to be its own peculiar sweetness.”
“There is such a place as fairyland – but only children can find the way to it…until they have grown so old that they forget the way. Only a few, who remain children at heart, can ever find that fair, lost path again…The world calls them singers and poets and artists and story-tellers; but they are just people who have never forgotten the way to fairyland.”
“The woods are never solitary — they are full of whispering, beckoning, friendly life. But the sea is a mighty soul, forever moaning of some great, unshareable sorrow, which shuts it up into itself for all eternity. We can never pierce its infinite mystery — we may only wander, awed and spellbound, on the outer fringe of it. The woods call to us with a hundred voices, but the sea has one only — a mighty voice.”
“Nobody is ever too old to dream. And dreams never grow old.”
“You never know what peace is until you walk on the shores or in the fields or along the winding red roads of Prince Edward Island in a summer twilight when the dew is falling and the old stars are peeping out and the sea keeps its mighty tryst with the little land it loves. You find your soul then. You realize that youth is not a vanished thing but something that dwells forever in the heart.”

Contemporary Dutch Art – Nelly van Nieuwenhuijzen

Below – “Twilight”; “Heavy weather in my polder”; “Dawn”; “Springtime in my polder”; “Salt Marshes, the Zeelandic coast”; “Eastern Scheldt Regatta.”


This Date in Literary History: Born 24 April 1905 – Robert Penn Warren, an American novelist, poet, literary critic, and two-time recipient of the Pulitzer Prize.

“Tell Me a Story”
by Robert Penn Warren

[A ]
Long ago, in Kentucky, I, a boy, stood
By a dirt road, in first dark, and heard
The great geese hoot northward.

I could not see them, there being no moon
And the stars sparse. I heard them.

I did not know what was happening in my heart.

It was the season before the elderberry blooms,
Therefore they were going north.

The sound was passing northward.

[ B ]
Tell me a story.

In this century, and moment, of mania,
Tell me a story.

Make it a story of great distances, and starlight.

The name of the story will be Time,
But you must not pronounce its name.

Tell me a story of deep delight.


Contemporary Slovakian Art – Peter Holecka

Below – “Suburban Temptations”; “Dreaming in pink.”


A Poem for Today

“Thanksgiving”
By Tim Nolan

Thanks for the Italian chestnuts—with their
tough shells—the smooth chocolaty
skin of them—thanks for the boiling water—

itself a miracle and a mystery—
thanks for the seasoned sauce pan
and the old wooden spoon—and all

the neglected instruments in the drawer—
the garlic crusher—the bent paring knife—
the apple slicer that creates six

perfect wedges out of the crisp Haralson—
thanks for the humming radio—thanks
for the program on the radio

about the guy who was a cross-dresser—
but his wife forgave him—and he
ended up almost dying from leukemia—

(and you could tell his wife loved him
entirely—it was in her deliberate voice)—
thanks for the brined turkey—

the size of a big baby—thanks—
for the departed head of the turkey—
the present neck—the giblets

(whatever they are)—wrapped up as
small gifts inside the cavern of the ribs—
‘thanks—thanks—thanks’—for the candles

lit on the table—the dried twigs—
the autumn leaves in the blue Chinese vase—
‘thanks’—for the faces—‘our faces’—in this low light.


Contemporary British Art – Jonathan Speed

Below – “Peach Light”; “Weekend Sail”; “Mediterranean Glow”; “Patricia Lake”; “After the Storm.”


This Date in Literary History: Died 24 April 2017 – Robert M. Pirsig, an American writer, philosopher, and author of “Sen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values.”

Some quotes from the work of Robert Pirsig:

“Mountains should be climbed with as little effort as possible and without desire. The reality of your own nature should determine the speed. If you become restless, speed up. If you become winded, slow down. You climb the mountain in an equilibrium between restlessness and exhaustion. Then, when you’re no longer thinking ahead, each footstep isn’t just a means to an end but a unique event in itself. To live only for some future goal is shallow. It’s the sides of the mountains which sustain life, not the top.”
“Care and Quality are internal and external aspects of the same thing. A person who sees Quality and feels it as he works is a person who cares. A person who cares about what he sees and does is a person who’s bound to have some characteristic of quality.”
“A person isn’t considered insane if there are a number of people who believe the same way. Insanity isn’t supposed to be a communicable disease. If one other person starts to believe him, or maybe two or three, then it’s a religion.”
“The past exists only in our memories, the future only in our plans. The present is our only reality.”
“The place to improve the world is first in one’s own heart and head and hands.”
“In a car you’re always in a compartment, and because you’re used to it you don’t realize that through that car window everything you see is just more TV. You’re a passive observer and it is all moving by you boringly in a frame. On a cycle the frame is gone. You’re completely in contact with it all. You’re in the scene, not just watching it anymore, and the sense of presence is overwhelming.”
“If a revolution destroys a systematic government, but the systematic patterns of thought that produced that government are left intact, then those patterns will repeat themselves in the succeeding government.”
“Other people can talk about how to expand the destiny of mankind. I just want to talk about how to fix a motorcycle. I think that what I have to say has more lasting value.”
“Unless you’re fond of hollering you don’t make great conversations on a running cycle. Instead you spend your time being aware of things and meditating on them. On sights and sounds, on the mood of the weather and things remembered, on the machine and the countryside you’re in, thinking about things at great leisure and length without being hurried and without feeling you’re losing time.”
“You are never dedicated to do something you have complete confidence in. No one is fanatically shouting that the sun is going to rise tomorrow. They know it’s going to rise tomorrow. When people are fanatically dedicated to political or religious faiths or any other kind of dogmas or goals, it’s always because these dogmas or goals are in doubt.”
“The only Zen you can find on the tops of mountains is the Zen you bring up there.”
“You look at where you’re going and where you are and it never makes sense, but then you look back at where you’ve been and a pattern seems to emerge.”

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