Sentient in San Francisco – 19 September 2019

This Date in Art History: Born 19 September 1918 – Pablita Valarde, a Native American painter.

Below – “Basketmaking”; “Swimming Mimbres Turtles”; “The Turtle Dance”; “Roadrunners”; “Bear Hunt – Ancient Hunter”; Untitled.


This Date in Literary History: Born 19 September 1894 – Rachel Field, an American writer, poet, author of “Hitty: Her First Hundred Years” and “Time out of Mind,” and recipient of the Newberry Award and the National Book Award: Part I of II.

Some quotes from the work of Rachel Field:

Isn’t it strange some people make You feel so tired inside. Your thoughts begin to shrivel up Like leaves all brown and dried! But when you’re with some other ones Its stranger still to find Your thought as thick as fireflies All shiny in your mind!”
It’s terrible when the weak are also cruel for then we are defenseless against them.
You know the public is more easily swayed by persons than by principles.
Too much good fortune can make you smug and unaware. Happiness should be like an oasis, the greener for the desert that surrounds it.
I was never one to begrudge people their memories. From a child I would listen when they spoke of the past.
No hardy perennial has the enduring quality of hope. Cut it to the roots, stamp it underfoot, let frost and fire work their will, and still some valiant shoot will push, to grow again on such scanty fare as it can find. Only time and the cruel quicklime of fact can destroy that stubborn urgency.

This Date in Art History: Zinaida Serebriakova, a Ukrainian-French painter: Part I of II.

Below – “Autumn Landscape”; “Self Portrait’; “The Artist’s Sister”; “Harvest”; “House of Cards.”

This Date in Literary History: Died 19 September 1902 – Masaoka Shiki, a Japanese poet, critic, and author. Literary consider Masaoka Shiki to be one of Japan’s greatest masters of haiku.

Haiku
by Masaoka Shiki

Night; and once again,
the while I wait for you, cold wind
turns into rain.

This Date in Art History: Zinaida Serebriakova, a Ukrainian-French painter: Part II of II.

Below – “At Breakfast”; “The Veranda in Spring”; “The Shoots of Autumn Crops”; “Portrait of Olga Lanceray”; “Apples on the Branches.”


This Date in Literary History: Born 19 September 1894 – Rachel Field, an American writer, poet, author of “Hitty: Her First Hundred Years” and “Time out of Mind,” and recipient of the Newberry Award and the National Book Award: Part II of II.

“If Once You Have Slept On An Island”
by Rachel Field

If once you have slept on an island
You’ll never be quite the same;
You may look as you looked the day before
And go by the same old name,
You may bustle about in street and shop
You may sit at home and sew,
But you’ll see blue water and wheeling gulls
Wherever your feet may go.

You may chat with the neighbors of this and that
And close to your fire keep,
But you’ll hear ship whistle and lighthouse bell
And tides beat through your sleep.
Oh! you won’t know why and you can’t say how
Such a change upon you came,
But once you have slept on an island,
You’ll never be quite the same.

Below – Jamie Wyeth: “If once you have slept on an island”


Contemporary British Art – Cody Choi

Below (photographs) – “Dancer: Juan #26”; “Above the Clouds #20”; “Dancer: Isabella #4”; “Dancer: Game #3”; “Dancer: Juan #1”; “Dancer: Juan #2”; “Dancer: Flora #2.”


A Poem for Today

“Heart”
by Rick Campbell

My heart was suspect.
Wired to an EKG,
I walked a treadmill
that measured my ebb
and flow, tracked isotopes
that ploughed my veins,
looked for a constancy
I’ve hardly ever found.
For a month I worried
as I climbed the stairs
to my office.  The mortality
I never believed in
was here now.  They
say my heart’s ok,
just high cholesterol, but
I know my heart’s a house
someone has broken into,
a room you come back
to and know some stranger
with bad intent has been there
and touched all that you love.  You know
he can come back.  It’s his call,
his house now.

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