Sentient in San Francisco – 11 February 2020

This Date in Art History: Born 11 February 1855, Died 11 February 1940 – Ellen Day Hale, an American painter: Part I of II.

Below – “Morning News”; “Lilies”; “June”; “Woman by Firelight”; “Summer Place”; “Self-Portrait.”

This Date in Literary History: Born 11 February 1944 – Joy Williams, an award-winning American novelist, short story writer, and essayist.

Some quotes from the work of Joy Williams

“Someone once told me a story about long term relationships. To think of them as a continent to explore. I could spend a lifetime backpacking through Africa, and I would still never know all there is to know about that continent. To stay the course, to stay intentional, to stay curious and connected – that’s the heart of it. But it’s so easy to lose track of the trail, to get tired, to want to give up, or to want a new adventure. It can be so easy to lose sight of the goodness and mystery within the person sitting right in front of you.”
“Nothing we do is inevitable, but everything we do is irreversible.”
“You don’t believe in Nature anymore. It’s too isolated from you. You’ve abstracted it. It’s so messy and damaged and sad. Your eyes glaze as you travel life’s highway past all the crushed animals and the Big Gulp cups.”
“Memory is the resurrection. The dead move among us the living in our memory and that is the resurrection.”
“You must stop worrying about why things happen and wonder what they mean when they do.”

This Date in Art History: Born 11 February 1855, Died 11 February
1940 – Ellen Day Hale, an American painter: Part II of II.

Below – “The Sisters”;“Kettle”; “Portrait of a Woman”; “Portrait of a friend”; “Northern Plains Native American Woman”; “Dragon fly.”


This Date in Literary History: Died 11 February 1986 – Frank Herbert, an American science fiction writer and author of “Dune.”

Some quotes from the work of Frank Herbert:

“All governments suffer a recurring problem: Power attracts pathological personalities.”
“The mystery of life isn’t a problem to solve, but a reality to experience.”
“Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristocratic forms. No government in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, government tends more and more to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class — whether that class be hereditary royalty, oligarchs of financial empires, or entrenched bureaucracy.”
“The mistakes (of leaders) are amplified by the numbers who follow them without question. Charismatic leaders tend to build up followings, power structures and these power structures tend to be taken over by people who are corruptible. I don’t think that the old saw about ‘power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely’ is accurate: I think power attracts the corruptible.”
“The undeserving maintain power by promoting hysteria.”
“Governments can be useful to the governed only so long as inherent tendencies toward tyranny are restrained.”
“The gravest error a thinking person can make is to believe that one particular version of history is absolute fact. History is recorded by a series of observers, none of whom is impartial. The facts are distorted by sheer passage of time and thousands of years of humanity’s dark ages, deliberate misrepresentations by religious sects, and the inevitable corruption that comes from an accumulation of careless mistakes. The wise person, then, views history as a set of lessons to be learned, choices and ramifications to be considered and discussed, and mistakes that should never again be made.”
“Demagogues are so easy to identify. They gesture a lot and speak with pulpit rhythms, using words that ring of religious fervour and god-fearing sincerity. Sincerity with nothing behind it takes so much practice. The practice can always be detected. Repetition. Great attempts to keep your attention on words.”
“When politics and religion are intermingled, a people is suffused with a sense of invulnerability, and gathering speed in their forward charge, they fail to see the cliff ahead of them.”

This Date in Art History: Born 11 February 1930 – Roy De Forest, an American painter: Part I of II.

Below – “Country Dog Gentlemen”; ‘The Half Horse Life”; “Primeval Times”; “Cat”; “The Dog”; “Alpha.”


This Date in Literary History: Died 11 February 1963 – Sylvia Plath, an American poet, novelist, short story writer, and recipient of the Pulitzer Prize: Part I of II.

Some quotes from the work of Sylvia Plath:

“Love life day by day, color by color, touch by touch.”
“It’s a hell of a responsibility to be yourself. It’s much easier to be somebody else or nobody at all.”
“I can never read all the books I want; I can never be all the people I want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades, tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in life. And I am horribly limited.”
“Opinions are like orgasms…mine matters most and I really don’t care if you have one.”
“Hour by hour, day by day, life becomes possible.”
“Remember, remember, this is now, and now, and now. Live it, feel it, cling to it. I want to become acutely aware of all I’ve taken for granted.”


This Date in Art History: Born 11 February 1930 – Roy De Forest, an American painter: Part II of II.

Below – “An Equestrian Conversation”; “Big Foot #1”; “Black Horse Meadow”; “Island”; “Indian Joe reads the major works of Edmund Hussery.”

 

This Date in Literary History: Died 11 February 1963 – Sylvia Plath, an American poet, novelist, short story writer, and recipient of the Pulitzer Prize: Part II of II.

“Mad Girl’s Love Song”

by Sylvia Plath

I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead;
I lift my lids and all is born again.
(I think I made you up inside my head.)

The stars go waltzing out in blue and red,
And arbitrary blackness gallops in:
I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead.

I dreamed that you bewitched me into bed
And sung me moon-struck, kissed me quite insane.
(I think I made you up inside my head.)

God topples from the sky, hell’s fires fade:
Exit seraphim and Satan’s men:
I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead.

I fancied you’d return the way you said,
But I grow old and I forget your name.
(I think I made you up inside my head.)

I should have loved a thunderbird instead;
At least when spring comes they roar back again.
I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead.
(I think I made you up inside my head.)”

This entry was posted in Art and Photography, Books, Movies, Music, and Television, Opinion. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply