Wandering in Woodacre – 5 July 2020

Contemporary French Art – Rocio Navarro

Below – “Montana #7”; “Portrait of Frida Kahlo”; “Montana #3”;
“Montana #6”; “Orange mantis”; “Montana #5.”

This Date in Literary History: Died 5 July 1991 – Howard Nemerov, an American poet and recipient of then Bollingen Prize, the National Book Award, and the Pulitzer Prize: Part I of III.

Some quotes from the work of Howard Nemerov:

“Nothing in the universe can travel at the speed of light, they say, forgetful of the shadow’s speed.”
“This Constitutional Republic called America is an historic aberration. Any honest student of history will note that the prevailing socio-economic system is feudalism, where a tiny minority control the vast majority of wealth, power, and resources. In doing so, they have absolute control over the 99% of the population. Power equals control.”
“The spirit world doesn’t admit to communicating with me, so it’s fairly even.”
“I liked the kid who wrote me that he had to do a term paper on a modern poet and he was doing me because, though they say you have to read poems twice, he found he could handle mine in one try.”
“The secrets of success are a good wife and a steady job. My wife told me.”


Contemporary British Art – Yvonne Coomber

Below – “All The Love Songs of Sweet Summer Days”; “You Are My Passion”; “Tangerine Dreams”; “Your Love Is King”; “Joy Kisses the Earth”; “You Have My Heart.”


This Date in Literary History: Died 5 July 1991 – Howard Nemerov, an American poet and recipient of then Bollingen Prize, the National Book Award, and the Pulitzer Prize: Part II of III.

“Threshold”
by Howard Nemerov

When in still air and still in summertime
A leaf has had enough of this, it seems
To make up its mind to go; fine as a sage
Its drifting in detachment down the road.

Below – Billy Sunarta: “Leaf 5”

Contemporary British Art – David Wightman

Below – “Helena”; “Ariadne ii”; “Penelope ii”; “Andromeda”; “Celine iv”; “Herculine.”


This Date in Literary History: Died 5 July 1991 – Howard Nemerov, an American poet and recipient of then Bollingen Prize, the National Book Award, and the Pulitzer Prize: Part III of III.

“A Spell Before Winter”
by Howard Nemerov

After the red leaf and the gold have gone,
Brought down by the wind, then by hammering rain
Bruised and discolored, when October’s flame
Goes blue to guttering in the cusp, this land
Sinks deeper into silence, darker into shade.
There is a knowledge in the look of things,
The old hills hunch before the north wind blows.

Now I can see certain simplicities
In the darkening rust and tarnish of the time,
And say over the certain simplicities,
The running water and the standing stone,
The yellow haze of the willow and the black
Smoke of the elm, the silver, silent light
Where suddenly, readying toward nightfall,
The sumac’s candelabrum darkly flames.
And I speak to you now with the land’s voice,
It is the cold, wild land that says to you
A knowledge glimmers in the sleep of things:
The old hills hunch before the north wind blows.

Below – Amanda Horvath: “Woodland Dreams”

Contemporary American Art – Kristin Hart

Below (color washed photographs) – “California Desert – Rose”; “California Color 2”; “Desert Dream, Tucson”; “Desert Garden – Pale Blue”; “Shadows, Joshua Tree”; “Desert Garden – Aquamarine.”

A Poem for Today

“The Print the Whales Make”
by Marge Saiser

You and I on the boat notice
the print the whales leave,
the  huge ring their diving draws
for a time on the surface.
Is it like that when we
lose one another? Don’t
know, can’t. But
I want to believe
when we can no longer
walk across a room
for a hug, can no longer
step into the arms of the other,
there will be this:
some trace that stays
while the great body
remains below out of sight,
dark mammoth shadow
flick of flipper
body of delight
diving deep.

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