Wandering in Woodacre – 30 July 2020

Contemporary Polish Art – Jacek Malinowski

Below – “Primavera”; “Spring!”; “Maggio”; “‘“Il tramonto / ultimo giorno di maggio”; “Val d’orcio.”


This Date in Literary History: Born 30 July 1818 – Emily Bronte, an English novelist, poet, and author of “Wuthering Heights.”

Some quotes from “Wuthering Heights”:

“He’s more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same.”
“Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living. You said I killed you–haunt me then. The murdered do haunt their murderers. I believe–I know that ghosts have wandered the earth. Be with me always–take any form–drive me mad. Only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! It is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!”
“I have not broken your heart – you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine.”
“She burned too bright for this world.”
“I have dreamt in my life, dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas; they have gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the color of my mind. And this is one: I’m going to tell it – but take care not to smile at any part of it.”
“I cannot express it; but surely you and everybody have a notion that there is or should be an existence of yours beyond you. What were the use of my creation, if I were entirely contained here? My great miseries in this world have been Heathcliff’s miseries, and I watched and felt each from the beginning: my great thought in living is himself. If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger: I should not seem a part of it. My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods: time will change it, I’m well aware, as winter changes the trees. My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Heathcliff! He’s always, always in my mind: not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being.”

Contemporary American Art – Natsumi Goldfish

Below – “Under the New Moon”; “I Want To See You”; “Blur The Border, Not. II”; “Kaonashi Girl” (No Face Girl); “A Compact Mirror”; “The Bath”; “Mandarin Orange.”


A Poem for Today

“Delivered”
by Cynthia Ventresca

She lived there for years in a
small space in a high rise that saw
her winter years dawn. When the past
became larger than her present,
she would call and thank us for cards
we gave her when we were small;
for Christmas, Mother’s Day, her birthday,
our devotion scrawled amidst depictions
of crooked hearts and lopsided lilies.

She would write out new ones,
and we found them everywhere—unsent;
in perfect cursive she wished us joy,
chains of x’s and o’s circling her signature.
And when her time alone was over,
the space emptied of all but sunshine, dust,
and a cross nailed above her door,
those cards held for us a bitter peace;
they had finally been delivered.


Contemporary Dutch Art – Mieke van Thiel

Below – “Golden Age Jan Davidsz. de Heem 4”; “Salad”; “Pansies”; “Strawberries”; “Magnolia”; “Daffodils in Vase.”


A Poem for Today

“Ah, Ah”
by Joy Harjo

Ah, ah cries the crow arching toward the heavy sky over the marina.
Lands on the crown of the palm tree.
Ah, ah slaps the urgent cove of ocean swimming through the slips.
We carry canoes to the edge of the salt.
Ah, ah groans the crew with the weight, the winds cutting skin.
We claim our seats. Pelicans perch in the draft for fish.
Ah, ah beats our lungs and we are racing into the waves.
Though there are worlds below us and above us, we are straight ahead.
Ah, ah tattoos the engines of your plane against the sky—away from these waters.
Each paddle stroke follows the curve from reach to loss.
Ah, ah calls the sun from a fishing boat with a pale, yellow sail. We fly by
on our return, over the net of eternity thrown out for stars.
Ah, ah scrapes the hull of my soul. Ah, ah.

Below – Mike Crozier: “Canoe on the Rocks at Sunset”

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