Wandering in Woodacre – 29 September

This Date in Art History: Died 29 September 1910 – Winslow Homer, an American painter, illustrator, and engraver.

Below – “The Fog Warning”; “Moonlight”; “The Gulf Stream”; “Girl and Laurel”; “Mink Pond”; “Watching the Breakers.”

This Date in Literary History: Died 29 September 1967 – Carson McCullers, an American novelist, short story writer, playwright, essayist, poet, and author of “The Heart Ia a Lonely Hunter.”

Some quotes from the work of Carson McCullers:

“We are torn between nostalgia for the familiar and an urge for the foreign and strange. As often as not, we are homesick most for the places we have never known.”
“To know who you are, you have to have a place to come from.”
“The memories of childhood have a strange shuttling quality, and areas of darkness ring the spaces of light. The memories of childhood are like clear candles in an acre of night, illuminating fixed scenes from surrounding darkness.”
“How can the dead be truly dead when they still live in the souls of those who are left behind?”
“There is no stillness like the quiet of the first cold nights in the fall.”
“The Heart is a lonely hunter with only one desire! To find some lasting comfort in the arms of another’s fire…driven by a desperate hunger to the arms of a neon light, the heart is a lonely hunter when there’s no sign of love in sight!”


This Date in Art History: Died 29 September 2005 – Patrick Caulfield, an English painter.

Below- “After Lunch”; “Picnic Set”; “Interior Night”; “Pitcher”; “Still Life with Dagger”; “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon vues de Derrière.”

This Date in Literary History: Died 29 September 1973 – W. H. Auden, an Anglo-American poet

“The More Loving One”
by W. H. Auden

Looking up at the stars, I know quite well

That, for all they care, I can go to hell,

But on earth indifference is the least

We have to dread from man or beast.

 

How should we like it were stars to burn

With a passion for us we could not return?

If equal affection cannot be,

Let the more loving one be me.

 

Admirer as I think I am

Of stars that do not give a damn,

I cannot, now I see them, say

I missed one terribly all day.

 

Were all stars to disappear or die,

I should learn to look at an empty sky

And feel its total dark sublime,

Though this might take me a little time.


Contemporary Bulgarian Art – Magdalena Kalieva: Part I of II.

Below – “The lightning tree”; “Peaches and nectarines”; “Space”; “Kingfisher”; “Boat blue”; “Morning toilet.”

A Poem for Today

“Blind Date”
by Jay Leeming

Our loneliness sits with us at dinner, an unwanted guest
who never says anything. It’s uncomfortable. Still

we get to know each other, like students allowed
to use a private research library for only one night.

I go through her file of friends, cities and jobs.
“What was that like?” I ask. “What did you do then?”

We are each doctors who have only ourselves
for medicine, and long to prescribe it for what ails

the other. She has a nice smile. ‘Maybe, maybe . . . ‘
I tell myself. But my heart is a cynical hermit

who frowns once, then shuts the door of his room
and starts reading a book. All I can do now is want

to want her. Our polite conversation coasts
like a car running on fumes, and then rolls to a stop;

we split the bill, and that third guest at the table
goes home with each of us, to talk and talk.

Below – Giorgio Gosti: “Walking alone”

Contemporary Bulgarian Art – Magdalena Kaileva: Part II of II.

Below – “Raising”; “Boat in the field”; “Vanity in the sky”; “Rush”; “Life reality”; “Female Volcano.”

A Poem for Today

“Hojoki”
by Kenneth Rexroth

A thing unknown for years,
Rain falls heavily in June,
On the ripe cherries, and on
The half cut hay.
Above the glittering
Grey water of the inlet,
In the driving, light filled mist,
A blue heron
Catches mice in the green
And copper and citron swathes.
I walk on the rainy hills.
It is enough.

Below – Christina Perneta: “Pico do Ariero”

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