Wandering in Woodacre – 13 February 2021

This Date in Art History: Born 13 February 1891 – Grant Wood, an American painter.

Below – “American Gothic”; “Fall Plowing”; “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere”; “Near Sundown”; “Iowa Cornfield”; “January.”

This Date in Literary History: Born 13 February 1881 – Eleanor Farjeon, an award-winning English writer of children’s stories and plays, poetry, biography, history, and satire. Farjeon’s best-known work is the song “Morning Has Broken,” memorably performed by Cat Stevens: Part I of II.

Some quotes from the work of Eleanor Farjeon:

“Morning has broken
Like the first morning.
Blackbird has spoken
Like the first bird.”
“It always gives me a shiver when I see a cat seeing what I can’t see.”
“We do not lose our friends when they die, we only lose sight of them.”
“The events of childhood do not pass but repeat themselves like seasons of the year.”
“Old sundial, you stand here for Time: For Love, the vine that round your base, Its tendrils twines, and dares to climb, And lay one flower-capped spray in grace, Without the asking on your cold, Unsmiling and unfrowning face.”
“On Hallowe’en the old ghosts come about us, and they speak to some; to others they are dumb.”
“No love-story has ever been told twice. I never heard any tale of lovers that did not seem to me as new as the world on its first morning.”
“Praise with elation
Praise every morning
Spring’s re-creation
Of the First Day!”

Contemporary American Art – Maria Cochez

Below – “Girls No. 8”; “Pool Painting No. 3”; “Pool Painting No. 5”; “Pool Painting No. 6”; “Pool Painting No. 7”; “Pool Painting No. 8.”

This Date in Literary History: Born 13 February 1881 – Eleanor Farjeon, an award-winning English writer of children’s stories and plays, poetry, biography, history, and satire. Farjeon’s best-known work is the song “Morning Has Broken,” memorably performed by Cat Stevens: Part II of II.

“Now that You Too Must Shortly Go”
by Eleanor Farjeon

Now that you too must shortly go the way
Which in these bloodshot years uncounted men
Have gone in vanishing armies day by day,
And in their numbers will not come again:

I must not strain the moments of our meeting
Striving for each look, each accent, not to miss,
Or question of our parting and our greeting,
Is this the last of all? is this—or this?

Last sight of all it may be with these eyes,
Last touch, last hearing, since eyes, hands, and ears,
Even serving love, are our mortalities,
And cling to what they own in mortal fears:—
But oh, let end what will, I hold you fast
By immortal love, which has no first or last.

Below – Sylvia Baldeva: “Remembering”

Contemporary Italian Art – Angus Hampel

Below – “Happiness”; “Silence”; “Portrait of mother”; “Dancing oranges”; “Rustling leaves”; “Fugue.”

This Date in Literary History: Died 13 February 2010 – Lucille Clifton, an American poet and recipient of the National Book Award: Part I of II.

Some quotes from the work of Lucille Clifton:

“What they call you is one thing. What you answer to is something else.”
“In the bigger scheme of things the universe is not asking us to do something, the universe is asking us to be something. And that’s a whole different thing.”
“I think that were beginning to remember that the first poets didn’t come out of a classroom, that poetry began when somebody walked off of a savanna or out of a cave and looked up at the sky with wonder and said, ‘Ahhh.’ That was the first poem.”
“I do not feel inhibited or bound by what I am. That does not mean that I have never had bad scenes relating to being Black and/or a woman, it means that other people’s craziness has not managed to make me crazy.”
“We need new words for what this is, this hunger entering our loneliness like birds, stunning our eyes into rays of hope. we need the flutter that can save us, something that will swirl across the face of what we have become and bring us grace.”

Contemporary Russian Art – Yulia Luchkina: Part I of II.

Below (painting) – “Full Moon”; “Guests”; “The Pillow Book”; “Russia. Holidays. Guessing”; “Doll”; “Sky”; “Thumbelina.”


This Date in Literary History: Died 13 February 2010 – Lucille Clifton, an American poet and recipient of the National Book Award: Part II of II.

“blessing the boats”
by Lucille Clifton

(at St. Mary’s)

may the tide
that is entering even now
the lip of our understanding
carry you out
beyond the face of fear
may you kiss
the wind then turn from it
certain that it will
love your back     may you
open your eyes to water
water waving forever
and may you in your innocence
sail through this to that

Contemporary Russian Art – Yulia Luchkina: Part II of II.

Below (watercolor) – “The lonely flower of plum smells sweet in a valley”; “Hunting for glowworms: I lean on gloom, That behind me…”; “Having scooped water, I’ll find in my hands the moon”; “Sworn enemies Not having, wives, After a dinner, Having gathered in cafe, chattering, Till tongues will not wither”; “Lark: the middle of the sky – It’s here! It’s here!”; “Moonrise.”


A Poem for Today

“What My Father Left Behind”
by Chris Forhan

Jam jar of cigarette ends and ashes on his workbench,
hammer he nailed our address to a stump with,
balsa wood steamship, half-finished—

is that him, waving from the stern? Well, good luck to him.
Slur of sunlight filling the backyard, August’s high wattage,
white blossoming, it’s a curve, it comes back.   My mother

in a patio chair, leaning forward, squinting, threading
her needle again, her eye lifts to the roof, to my brother,
who stands and jerks his arm upward—he might be

insulting the sky, but he’s only letting go
a bit of green, a molded plastic soldier
tied to a parachute, thin as a bread bag, it rises, it arcs

against the blue—good luck to it—my sister and I below,
heads tilted back as we stand in the grass, good
luck to all of us, still here, still in love with it.

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