Wandering in Woodacre – 19 February 2021

Contemporary American Art – Crystal MacClain

Below – “Life”; “Stardust falls (Fireflies)”; “Arriving”; “Torrent”; “Desert Bloom”; “The Beast Under the Sea.”


This Date in Literary History: Died 19 February 2016 – Harper Lee, an
American novelist, author of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” and recipient of the Pulitzer Prize.

Some quotes from the work of Harper Lee:

“I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and see it through no matter what.”
“The one thing that doesn’t abide by majority rule is a person’s conscience.”
“People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for.”
“Sometimes the Bible in the hand of one man is worse than a whisky bottle in the hand of (another)… There are just some kind of men who – who’re so busy worrying about the next world they’ve never learned to live in this one, and you can look down the street and see the results.”
“When a child asks you something, answer him, for goodness sake. But don’t make a production of it. Children are children, but they can spot an evasion faster than adults, and evasion simply muddles ’em.”
“Atticus said to Jem one day, ‘I’d rather you shot at tin cans in the backyard, but I know you’ll go after birds. Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.’ That was the only time I ever heard Atticus say it was a sin to do something, and I asked Miss Maudie about it. ‘Your father’s right,’ she said. ‘Mockingbirds don’t do one thing except make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corn cribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.’”

Contemporary American Art – Taylor White

Below – “Wise Watcher”; “Aurora”; “VVatcher”; “Crisp”; “Glow”;“Burning River.”


This Date in Literary History: Died 19 February 1952 – Knut Hamsun, Norwegian novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, short story writer, author of “Hunger,” and recipient of the 1920 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Some quotes from the work of Knut Hamsun:

“An increasing number of people who lead mental lives of great intensity, people who are sensitive by nature, notice the steadily more frequent appearance in them of mental states of great strangeness … a wordless and irrational feeling of ecstasy; or a breath of psychic pain; a sense of being spoken to from afar, from the sky or the sea; an agonizingly developed sense of hearing which can cause one to wince at the murmuring of unseen atoms; an irrational staring into the heart of some closed kingdom suddenly and briefly revealed.”
“The intelligent poor individual was a much finer observer than the intelligent rich one. The poor individual looks around him at every step, listens suspiciously to every word he hears from the people he meets; thus, every step he takes presents a problem, a task, for his thoughts and feelings. He is alert and sensitive, he is experienced, his soul has been burned.”
“I see stars before my eyes, and my thoughts are swept up into a hurricane of light.”
“But now it was spring again, and spring was almost unbearable for sensitive hearts. It drove creation to its utmost limits, it wafted its spice-laden breath even into the nostrils of the innocent.”
“‘I love three things,’ I then say. ‘I love a dream of love I once had, I love you, and I love this patch of earth.’
‘And which do you love best?’
‘The dream.’”
“And the great spirit of darkness spread a shroud over me…everything was silent-everything. But upon the heights soughed the everlasting song, the voice of the air, the distant, toneless humming which is never silent.”
“I have gone to the forest”

Contemporary German Art – Kristina Kanders

Below – “Maid, After Banksy”; “Doris Cleaning Bowl”; “Geraldine Grinding Meat”; “Karen with Miele”; “Carmen on the Phone”; “Housewife Fumiyo.”

This Date in Literary History: Born 19 February 1952 – Amy Tan, an award-winning American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and author of “The Joy Luck Club” and “The Kitchen God’s Wife.”

Some quotes from the work of Amy Tan:

“We dream to give ourselves hope. To stop dreaming – well, that’s like saying you can never change your fate.”
“Chance is the first step you take, luck is what comes afterward.”
“I am like a falling star who has finally found her place next to another in a lovely constellation, where we will sparkle in the heavens forever.”
“I hid my deepest feelings so well I forgot where I placed them.”
“That was how dishonesty and betrayal started, not in big lies but in small secrets.”
“And then it occurs to me. They are frightened. In me, they see their own daughters, just as ignorant, just as unmindful of all the truths and hopes they have brought to America. They see daughters who grow impatient when their mothers talk in Chinese, who think they are stupid when they explain things in fractured English. They see that joy and luck do not mean the same to their daughters, that to these closed American-born minds ‘joy luck’ is not a word, it does not exist. They see daughters who will bear grandchildren born without any connecting hope passed from generation to generation.”


Contemporary Italian Art – Aurora Grimaldi

Below – “Hands – Birds”; “Hands – Violin”; “Hands – Origami”; “Women – Peony”; “Women – Flowers”; “Women – Sea.”


This Date in Literary History: Born 19. February 11936 – Frederick Seidel, an award-winning American poet.

“Snow”
by Frederick Seidel

Snow is what it does.
It falls and it stays and it goes.
It melts and it is here somewhere.
We all will get there.

Below – Dyanne Wilson: “Snow Falling on Cedars” (photograph)

This entry was posted in Art and Photography, Books, Movies, Music, and Television, Opinion. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply