Wandering in Woodacre – 18 July 2021

Contemporary Czech Art – Eva Fajcikova

Below – “Despair”; “Primavera”; “Greed”; “Carolina”; “Michaela”; “Magdalene.”

This Date in Literary History: Died 18 July 1817 – Jane Austen, an English novelist and author of “Pride and Prejudice” and “Emma.”

Some quotes from the work of Jane Austen:

“Look into your own heart because who looks outside, dreams, but who looks inside awakes.”
“Our scars make us know that our past was for real.”
“There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.”
“Nobody minds having what is too good for them.”
“And sometimes I have kept my feelings to myself, because I could find no language to describe them in.”
“Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves; vanity, to what we would have others think of us.”
“Self-knowledge is the first step to maturity.”

Contemporary American Art – Harpereet Kaur Sandhu

Below – “Green Hibiscus”; “High Time Tea Time”; “Green Tile”; “monstera”; “Figures at Home”; “Stanley the Red Snake.”

A Poem for Today

“The Sanitarium Window”
by Leland James

A small stand of trees, unremarkable.
I don’t know their names.
They’re like a knot of folks waiting
for a train, or for a store to open
—a gathering, that’s all. They don’t
seem to know each other. They didn’t
plan to be together there in a field of weeds.

Yet, on second look, they are remarkable,
having stood the invisible winds of winter,
stood the bitter season that comes
to each alone, that separateness of sickness
—mind and soul—there in the bent of trees.
The trees seem to know all about winter.
Seem to have winter in their bones.

Perhaps someone else would see them
differently, a different reflection,
a family gathering, not just a knot.
Some might see them that way.
Some might see them differently.
And I too, perhaps, on a different day.

The others around me, others
by the window, silently looking out
—I can see us reflected in the window
when the light is just right. Another
stand of trees, a knot, not planning
to be together here in a field of weeds.

Below – Briana Morrison: “Heilstatten Hohenlychen Sanatorium” (photograph)

Contemporary American Art – Elizabeth Kenney: Part I of II

Below – “Train of Thought”; “Western Highway”; “Heart of the Night”; “Highway Song”; “Your Cloud”; “The Journey.”


A Poem for Today

“The Wall”
by Bruce Guernsey

Someone has opened a giant map
and with the tips of our fingers,
each of us suddenly blind,
we track the black cold of this monument
for names we know
like finding a route home.

Lost here
this damp spring morning,
the cherries exploding like the fourth of July,
we wonder how many maps of Viet Nam
sold those years,
so many strange sounding places.

One of us holds a magnifying glass
to McCarroll, McMorris, McNabb,
small print in the polished stone,
the way a neighbor, say, in Neoga, Illinois
might have done, late at night
searching that faraway land on his kitchen table,

hearing again the morning paper
thump against the front door,
that boy on his bike in the dark
grown and gone—what was his name,
‘that kid from down the block?’—
Khe Sanh, Da Nang, Hanoi.

–for PFC William “Willie” Searle

Below – Robin Repp: “Vietnam War Memorial Wall” (photograph)

Contemporary American Art – Elizabeth Kenney: Part II of II.

Below – “Night on the Dock”; “Fireworks”; “Long long time”; “To Seethe World in a Grain of Sand”; “Wild Geese”; “Santiago.”

A Poem for Today

“Good News”
by Steve Langan

We say the trees are a canopy in mid July,
as if that’s a special description of home.

Walking down the hill to see a friend,
I have good news and bad news for him.

We say canopy made out of stars as our
special way to describe the universe to ourselves.

So which one will my friend choose today?

Canopy of trees gives way to the sky;
I’m walking now thinking all the way which
one will he choose good or bad which one?

I guess I can just say instead I love the way
you fixed up the place and these colors.

At a certain age a man can begin to say
things like that to his friends.

Below – Taskin B: “Night Full of Stars”

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